‘One Day in the Haram’ documentary to debut soon

The Grand Mosque in Makkah.
Updated 11 August 2017
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‘One Day in the Haram’ documentary to debut soon

JEDDAH: A 90-minute documentary titled “One Day in the Haram,” which details what it is like in the Grand Mosque in Makkah through the eyes of workers and clerics, is slated to debut in September.
The film — by British writer, producer and director Abrar Hussain — is set to be the biggest media project about the Grand Mosque in history.
The official trailer was uploaded on YouTube last week and has gone viral.
“The film is designed to attract a non-Muslim audience, to show them how important Makkah is,” said Hussain.
“We wanted to film Makkah because it was very important to show a beautiful side of Islam (so) non-Muslims can say, ‘Okay, this is how beautiful and peaceful this religion is’.”
He added: “We want to convey this message to as many people as possible, especially in the West. After film festivals, we will speak to Netflix and different TV stations to screen it.”
The Grand Mosque is the largest in the world and includes Islam’s holiest site, the Kaaba. Muslims worldwide face in its direction when praying.
There have been films about the mosque from the perspective of worshippers and visitors, but never before about the daily life of its workers.
Hussain said he wants to show how successfully the mosque is run, how organized its departments are, and how seriously its workers take their jobs. The project was very challenging because the place is never empty of worshippers, said Hussain.

It took him one year of research before he was able to start filming, because the documentary is “very detailed.”
The budget amounted to SR1 million ($266,652). The executive producer, Abdulelah Al-Ahmary, also runs the Arabian Pictures production company.
The Makkah premiere will take place in September, but the exact release date has not yet been announced.


Saudi Arabia says missing journalist Jamal Khashoggi is dead

Updated 20 October 2018
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Saudi Arabia says missing journalist Jamal Khashoggi is dead

  • The journalist died after a fistfight at the consulate in Istanbul
  • Deputy intelligence chief, royal court adviser removed from positions, 18 Saudis arrested

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia announced on Saturday the death of missing journalist Jamal Khashoggi, saying a preliminary investigation indicated he lost his life after a fight at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.
“The discussions between Jamal Khashoggi and those he met at the kingdom's consulate in Istanbul... devolved into a fistfight, leading to his death,” the Saudi Press Agency said, citing the public prosecutor.
Eighteen Saudis have been arrested in connection with the incident and the investigation is ongoing, the public prosecutor said.
“The Kingdom expresses its deep regret at the painful developments that have taken place and stresses the commitment of the authorities in the Kingdom to bring the facts to the public opinion, to hold all those involved accountable and bring them to justice,” a statement on the SPA said.
Khashoggi, a Saudi journalist who lived in the US, disappeared on Oct. 2 after visiting the consulate to complete paperwork related to his divorce.
Deputy intelligence chief Ahmed Al-Asiri was removed from his position and Saud Al-Qahtani from his advisory role at the Royal Court, through royal decrees.
Three other intelligence officials who were also sacked have been named as Mohammad bin Saleh Al-Rumaih, Abdullah bin Khalifa Al-Shaya and Rashad bin Hamed Al-Muhamadi.
King Salman also ordered the creation of a ministerial committee, headed by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, to restructure the country’s General Intelligence agency and issue the results of its work within a month.
Members of the committee include the interior and foreign ministers as well as the heads of the General Intelligence and State Security.
A team of Saudi investigators were sent to Istanbul and have been working on the case with Turkish detectives, who entered the consulate on Thursday.
Earlier in the week, Saudi Arabia promised a thorough and transparent investigation into what happened to the journalist in Turkey.