1,000 Qataris cross Saudi border

Qataris are still crossing the border, many in their own vehicles. (SPA)
Updated 26 August 2017
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1,000 Qataris cross Saudi border

JEDDAH: Nearly 1,000 Qataris have crossed the border with the Kingdom as of late Thursday, nearly 650 of whom have come to perform Hajj, according to Saudi authorities.
The Tawasol (Communication) Center has been showered with phone calls from Qataris inquiring about their travel to the Kingdom for the pilgrimage, said Abdullah Al-Madlaj, secretary-general of the King Salman Center for Hajj and Umrah.
Committees have been formed and deployed to the holy sites in Makkah, tasked with responding to any questions from pilgrims, including those from Qatar, he added.
The pilgrims were mainly asking about services offered as part of the King Salman Hajj and Umrah program, he said.
Qataris are still crossing the border, many in their own vehicles, Al-Madlaj added.
Reception sites are supplied with catering services, and pilgrims are told the names and addresses of the hotels they will be staying in at the program’s expense, he said.
The Ministry of Islamic Affairs, which oversees the King Salman Hajj and Umrah program, has deployed representatives at the Salwa border, and others in Dammam and Al-Ahsa, to provide services to Qatari guests.
The number of guests of the program for this Hajj season has reached some 4,000.


Egypt court sentences 65 people over 2013 violence

Updated 23 September 2018
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Egypt court sentences 65 people over 2013 violence

  • The Sunday decision by the Minya Criminal Court included a life sentence for Mohammed Badie
  • The case which ran for over three years included more than 35 hearings

CAIRO: An Egyptian court has sentenced 64 people to varying prison terms and one man to death over violence in 2013 when the military overthrew the elected Islamist president.
The Sunday decision by the Minya Criminal Court included a life sentence for Mohammed Badie, the spiritual guide of the now-outlawed Muslim Brotherhood group, over events in the city of el-Adwa, south of Cairo, where a crowd raided a police station and a sergeant was killed.
The case which ran for over three years included more than 35 hearings, with testimony by the defense and witnesses.
The death sentence, issued to a man named Ahmed Ashour, will now be reviewed by Egypt’s top religious authorities for their non-binding opinion. The ruling can still be appealed.