Decomposed body in boat washed up on remote Pacific island

A file photo taken on March 3, 2014, shows a high tide energized by storm surging washes across Ejit Island in Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands. Climate change will dominate discussions when the leaders of vulnerable Pacific nations hold their annual meeting in the Samoan capital Apia starting 05 September, 2017, with global warming threatening their existence, officials say. The 18-member Pacific Islands Forum (PIF) includes countries such as Kiribati and Tuvalu, which are only metres above sea level and risk being swamped by rising oceans. (AFP)
Updated 06 September 2017
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Decomposed body in boat washed up on remote Pacific island

MAJURO, Marshall Islands: A decomposed body, believed to be Mexican or Colombian, has been found in a washed up boat on a remote Pacific island, officials said Wednesday, raising the possibility it had drifted 9,400 kilometers (5,800 miles) from Latin America.
The remains were in a six-meter (20 feet), blue fiberglass vessel with a 150 horsepower engine that was found on Likiep Atoll in the Marshall Islands.
Authorities believe there may have been three people on board — one from Mexico and two from Colombia — based on identity cards found.
“The body was really decomposed, so we couldn’t identify it with the ID cards we found on the boat,” Likiep Atoll Mayor Veronica Wase said.
The IDs were for a Mexican and two Colombians — one of whom was a fisherman for “ornamental fish” according to another document found on the boat.
Two fishermen from Likiep found the boat last Friday and alerted local officials with Wase calling in government, law enforcement and health officials from the capital Majuro.
The body was left on the atoll, 386 kilometers north of Majuro, until it was cremated earlier this week to avoid any health problems for local residents, authorities said.
Ministry of Foreign Affairs staff said they were communicating with the Mexican embassy in the Philippines about the find.
Three years ago an El Salvadoran, Jose Alvarenga, survived 14 months adrift from Mexico, floating into Ebon Atoll in the Marshall Islands on a similar size fiberglass boat.
Another fisherman with Alvarenga died during the voyage.
In 2006, three Mexicans were rescued near the Marshalls after drifting for more than nine months.


Three of four engines on stricken Norway cruise ship restarted

Updated 24 March 2019
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Three of four engines on stricken Norway cruise ship restarted

  • The Viking Sky lost power and started drifting mid-afternoon Saturday about two kilometers off More og Romsdal in dangerous waters and high seas
  • The captain forced to send out a distress call and trigger a massive airlift operation

OSLO: A cruise ship that broke down in rough seas off the Norwegian coast with some 1,300 passengers and crew on board has restarted three of its four engines and will be towed to port, emergency services said Sunday.
“Three of the four engines are now working which means the boat can now make way on its own,” emergency services spokesman Per Fjeld said.
The Viking Sky lost power and started drifting mid-afternoon Saturday about two kilometers (1.2 miles) off More og Romsdal in dangerous waters and high seas, prompting the captain to send out a distress call and trigger a massive airlift operation.
The airlift was continuing in the early morning, Fjeld said.
Police said 338 of the 1,373 people on board the Viking Sky had so far been taken off by helicopter.
The vessel is making slow headway at two to three knots (4-5 kilometers) an hour off the dangerous, rocky coast and a tug will help it toward the port of Molde, about 500 kilometers northwest of Oslo, officials said.
Police said that 17 people had been taken to hospital.
The passengers are mostly British or American, they added.