Louvre Abu Dhabi to open in November as cultural district takes shape

French Minister of Culture Francoise Nyssen, left, and Chairman of Abu Dhabi Tourism Mohamed Khalifa Al-Mubarak announce the Louvre Abu Dhabi will open to the public on Nov. 11 at a press conference in Abu Dhabi on Wednesday. (AFP)
Updated 07 September 2017
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Louvre Abu Dhabi to open in November as cultural district takes shape

LONDON: The Louvre Abu Dhabi will finally open to the public on Nov. 11, over a decade after the project was launched, Francoise Nyssen, France’s culture minister, has announced.
The gallery, part of the Saadiyat Cultural District in the UAE capital, is the first establishment outside the original Louvre in Paris, home to the world’s largest art collection, to carry the famous name.
Nyssen said the opening, expected to be attended by French President Emmanuel Macron, will demonstrate that the West and the Arab world are united in the face of terror attacks and intolerance around the globe.
“At a time when culture is under attack this is our joint response. It is civilization responding to barbarity,” he said.
The museum aims to attract people from neighboring Arab countries and around the world, according to Sheikh Nahyan bin Mubarak Al-Nahyan, the UAE culture minister.
“Just as the Louvre is the crown jewel of Paris, so the Louvre Abu Dhabi is destined for such a distinction,” he said.
While the excitement was palpable, there was also undoubtedly a huge sense of relief. The project has been beset by problems over funding, construction and workers’ rights, and was originally scheduled to open in 2012.
On top of that, from the start there have been frequent criticisms of the 30-year partnership between France and the UAE, worth $1.1 billion, which will see many top French museums loan art to Abu Dhabi. Some have accused the Louvre of “selling its soul.”
However, museum Director Manuel Rabate said that once open, Louvre Abu Dhabi will prove to be a brilliant example of cultural exchange.
“It’s exceptional… This is the first time a project of this kind has been launched in the Middle East. But that’s what’s so unique about this project,” Rabate said in response to the critics.
The waterfront gallery will display pieces from pre-history to the contemporary era. Besides Middle Eastern artefacts and paintings, it will include works by artists such as Paul Gauguin, Pablo Picasso and Cy Twombly.
“You have nude statues in the museum, contemporary paintings. You also have religious images from all religions,” Jean-Francois Charnier, scientific director of Agence France-Museums, revealed.
Major pieces include an Egyptian funeral set from the 10th century BC, a 15th century depiction of the Madonna and child by Giovanni Bellini and an 1878 Turkish painting titled “A Young Emir Studying” by Osama Hamdy Bey.
They will be housed in a series of white buildings topped by a cross-hatched steel dome, designed by French architect Jean Nouvel, to let in shafts of light.
Mohamed Khalifa Al-Mubarak, chairman of the Abu Dhabi Tourism and Culture Authority, tried to allay worries about the transportation of the art and the conditions in which it will be stored, in a country where temperatures soar well above 40 degrees Celsius in the summer.
“Their protection is vital to us and we have made sure we have the systems in place to protect them against the environmental conditions,” Al-Mubarak said.
Guarded by Emirati forces, in coordination with French experts, including civil defense and terrorism security forces, the exhibits are protected by “state of the art security systems and procedures, in line with international standards,” Al-Mubarak added.
The Louvre Abu Dhabi is part of the the UAE capital’s drive to promote the city as a cultural hub of the Middle East, and as a patron of the arts in a region increasingly focused on soft power.
About 5 percent of the overall museum will be dedicated to contemporary and modern art. The rest will focus on telling the story of world history and religions.
In the gallery of world religions, a sixth century Qur’an, a gothic Bible and a Yemeni Torah face each other, open at verses that give similar accounts.
“To send that message of tolerance is really important for our time,” Al-Mubarak said.
The gallery forms just part of the city’s cultural drive. Branches of the Guggenheim and the Zayed Museum, the national museum named after the country’s founder, are both under construction on the same island.
The hope is that the combination of world-class art and cultural tolerance will make a statement about the UAE’s values.
“We’re definitely not this closed-off society that’s putting a massive wall up,” said Mubarak.
“We (the UAE and France) have exactly the same goal: we both want to tell the world how our history is connected.
“Through culture the world can become a better place.”


Recent appointments in Egypt show rise of women to high political office in Mideast

The appointment of the women ministers may help to assuage disappointment about the make-up of the rest of the — all male — Cabinet.
Updated 51 sec ago
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Recent appointments in Egypt show rise of women to high political office in Mideast

  • Recent appointments in Egypt are the latest example of the rise of women to high political office in the region
  • “The men’s monopoly has been broken,” the Jordanian National Commission for Women declared in a celebratory statement which also praised the prime minister’s “clear position”

CAIRO, LONDON: The appointment of two more female ministers this month to the new Egyptian Cabinet means women now fill eight out of 34 positions, the highest number in the modern history of Egypt.

Hala Zayed is the new health minister while Yasmine Fouad takes over as environment minister. Both women replaced men and join culture minister Inas Abdel-Dayem, tourism minister Rania Al-Mashat, Nabila Makram (immigration minister) Ghada Wali (social solidarity minister), Hala El-Saeed (planning minister) and Sahar Nasr (minister of investment and international cooperation).
The appointments by Egypt’s new Prime Minister Mostafa Madbouly have been welcomed as forward thinking by social and political commentators.
Dr. Magda Bagnied, a writer and professor of communication, told Arab News: “I believe whoever planned for those eight effective ministries was looking forward for the future of Egypt since they are all interconnected in some way, and having females leading them is a leap forward.
“A country’s rank and status is measured by the role of women. The higher the number of leadership roles for women, the further the country is considered to be on the road to development.”
Four out of 15 new deputy ministers are also women and women now hold 15 percent of the seats in Parliament.
The rise of women to high political office in the Arab world is by no means restricted to Egypt.
Jordan also has a record number of women ministers after Prime Minister-designate Omar Razzaz appointed seven women to the 29-member Cabinet sworn in last week.
“The men’s monopoly has been broken,” the Jordanian National Commission for Women declared in a celebratory statement which also praised the prime minister’s “clear position.”
The appointment of the women ministers may help to assuage disappointment about the make-up of the rest of the — all male — Cabinet.
Twenty-three members of the new Jordanian Cabinet have been ministers before and 13 were members of the outgoing government that was brought down by popular protest.
Rawan Joyoussi, whose posters became one of the defining images of the protests, said: “I was hoping that women would be empowered and I am happy with that. But as far as the composition of the rest of the government is concerned, I think we have to play our part to create the mechanisms that will hold the government accountable.”
In the UAE, women hold nine out of 31 ministerial positions, and one of them, Minister for Youth Shamma Al-Mazrui, is also the world’s youngest minister, appointed in 2016 when she was only 22.
This makes the UAE Cabinet nearly 30 percent female, which is higher than India, almost equal to the UK and far ahead of the US, where Donald Trump has just four women in his Cabinet.
The general election in Morocco in October 2016 produced 81 women members of Parliament, accounting for 21 percent of the total 395 seats. The Islamist Justice and Development Party (PJD), which won the most votes, also ended up with the highest number of women MPs, 18.
Though elections in Saudi Arabia were open to women only in 2015, it ranks 100th out of 193rd in the world league table of women in national governing bodies, slightly above the US at 102nd place.
A policy briefing from the Brookings Institution think-tank in Washington says that one of the best ways for a country to ease economic pressure and boost productivity is to increase female participation in the workplace and in political life.
“Introducing diversity through gender parity will benefit economic growth and can help Arab countries to generate prosperity as well as the normative and social imperative of change,” wrote analyst Bessma Momani.
Yet in some parts of the Middle East, female representation seems to be going backward.
In 2009, four of Kuwait’s 65 MPs were women. In 2012 there were three and in 2013 only one. In 2016, 15 women stood for election to the 50 open parliamentary seats (the other 15 are appointed). Only one, Safa Al-Hashem, who was already an MP, was successful.
Qatar has no women MPs or ministers at all.
Egypt’s appointment of two more women ministers does not have the appearance of tokenism. The new Health Minister, Hala Zayed, 51, has a solid background in the field as a former president of the Academy of Health Sciences, a hospital specializing in cancer treatment for children.
She was also government adviser on health, chairwoman of a committee for combating corruption at the ministry she now heads and also has a Ph.d. in project management.
Similarly, Yasmeen Fouad, 43, the new environment minister, has four years’ experience as a former assistant minister in the same department, where she was known as “the lady for difficult missions,” and liaised with the UN. She is also an assistant professor of economics and political science at Cairo University.
Egypt’s first female minister was Hikmat Abu Zaid, appointed minister of social affairs in 1962 by President Gamal Abdel Nasser, who dubbed her “the merciful heart of revolution.”
Now there are eight like her, demonstrating that in the Middle East, “girl power” is on the rise.