Saudi Arabia has eased Yemenis’ sufferings, says Saudi ambassador

Abdul Aziz bin Mohammed Al-Wasil.
Updated 13 September 2017
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Saudi Arabia has eased Yemenis’ sufferings, says Saudi ambassador

GENEVA: Saudi Arabia said it will continue its efforts to enhance and protect human rights emanating from the principles of Islamic Shariah.
Addressing the 36th session of the UN Human Rights Council, the Saudi envoy at the UN in Geneva, Abdul Aziz bin Mohammed Al-Wasil, said a call for the globalization of human rights does not mean imposition of principles and values contradicting Islamic values.
Al-Wasil expressed the Kingdom’s desire to continue and enhance cooperation with the UN Human Rights Commission (HRC), adding that the memo of understanding signed with the HRC is an important step in this direction. He said the programs, which were implemented with the HRC, aim to build national capacities for the enhancement and protection of human rights.
He said the latest aid provided by the Kingdom to Yemen came through the allocation of $66 million to fight cholera in Yemen, in addition to other humanitarian and material assistance. He expressed deep regret over the emergence of cholera and the urgent need for food and medicine in some parts of the country.
The Saudi envoy said areas controlled by the Houthis are those where cholera is spreading, and the need for humanitarian assistance is pressingly arising as the Houthi militia have seized humanitarian aid for resale to fund their war work.
He called on international organizations operating in Yemen to put pressure on the coup militias to facilitate and deliver humanitarian assistance to the intended beneficiaries.
Al-Wasil said Bahrain has suffered, and still suffering, from foreign interference trying to destabilize domestic security and divide national unity. Bahrain is exerting concrete and genuine efforts to protect human rights in the framework of its sovereign right to defend its security and stability against any external interference or terror acts, he said.
On Palestine, he said that for more than six decades, the Palestinian people have been constantly subjected to gross human rights violations.
In this context, he renewed the call on the international community to live up to its responsibility and take the necessary arrangements to end the sufferings of the Palestinian people.
He also reaffirmed the right of the Palestine people to self-determination and establishment of their independent state with Al-Quds as its capital.


Saudi MERS outbreaks killed 23 over four months: WHO

Updated 14 min 42 sec ago
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Saudi MERS outbreaks killed 23 over four months: WHO

  • The latest figures take the number of confirmed cases to 2,220 since September 2012, including 1,844 from Saudi Arabia
  • The disease is hard to spot, partly because it often infects people with an underlying condition such as diabetes, renal failure or chronic lung disease

GENEVA: Outbreaks of the deadly Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) killed 23 people in Saudi Arabia between Jan. 21 and May 31 this year, the World Health Organization said on Monday.
The deaths were among 75 laboratory-confirmed cases of MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) during the period, the WHO said, and take the total number of deaths from the disease to 790 since it was first diagnosed in humans in 2012.
The latest figures take the number of confirmed cases to 2,220 since September 2012, including 1,844 from Saudi Arabia.
One outbreak in February hit a private hospital in Hafer Albatin region, where the patient passed the disease to three health workers. There was another cluster of six cases in a hospital in Riyadh in the same month, although no health care workers were infected.
Two other clusters affected households in Jeddah and Najran.
MERS-CoV is a member of a virus family ranging from the common cold to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. It appears to have emerged in humans in Saudi Arabia in 2012, although it has been traced in camels, the source of the infection, back to at least 1983.
The disease is hard to spot, partly because it often infects people with an underlying condition such as diabetes, renal failure or chronic lung disease.
But it kills one in three sufferers, and hospital workers are at risk unless extreme caution is taken to identify MERS sufferers early and to protect health care workers from infection via airborne droplets such as from coughs and sneezes.
Susceptible people should avoid contact with suspected cases and with camels, and anyone who has contact with animals should wash their hands before and afterwards, the WHO said. Everyone should avoid drinking raw camel milk or camel urine, or eating undercooked meat.
Three MERS cases have been reported this year outside Saudi Arabia. Oman and the United Arab Emirates each reported a case, while in Malaysia a man fell ill after drinking unpasteurised camel milk during a pilgrimage to Saudi Arabia.