Ancient 3,000-year-old doll is favorite with museum goers

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Ancient 3,000-year-old doll is a hit with museum goers
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Is this 4,000-year-old model the oldest toy car around?
Updated 20 September 2017
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Ancient 3,000-year-old doll is favorite with museum goers

DUBAI: An ancient and rare doll believed to date back three millennia is proving a hit with history buffs at Turkey’s Gaziantep Medusa Glass Works Museum, the Daily Sabah has reported.
The 3,000-year-old puppet, which is believed to be the only one of its kind in a Turkish museum, is thought to have been used in ancient Greek theaters, museum director İbrahim Halil Algın was quoted as saying.
Made from warm clay, with moveable joints, it looks deceivingly heavy, Algin told Doğan News Agency.
“From the outside, the doll looks like it weighs around three to four kilograms, but it actually weighs 600 to 700 grams,” he explained.
The exhibition of exceedingly old artifacts also includes toy carts which are thought to date back as far as 4,000 years.


Python selfie puts Indian forest ranger in tight spot

Updated 18 June 2018
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Python selfie puts Indian forest ranger in tight spot

  • The Indian rock python is a non-venomous species, but it can quickly kill its prey by constricting blood flow

KOLKATA: An India forestry ranger found himself in a bind after a python briefly strangled him while he posed for pictures with the giant snake.
Wildlife officer Sanjay Dutta was called in Sunday by frantic villagers in West Bengal after they saw the 40-kilogramme (88-pound) python swallowing a goat alive.
Instead of placing it safely inside a bag, the ranger wrapped it around his neck and posed for pictures with stunned villagers.
But panic spread as the huge snake wound itself around Dutta’s neck, forcing him to struggle to free himself from its vice-like grip.
He escaped unscathed, but a little red-faced.
The Indian rock python is a non-venomous species, but it can quickly kill its prey by constricting blood flow and can grow up to 10 meters (33 feet) long.
West Bengal’s forest department has launched an official inquiry into the ranger’s conduct and flouting of safety protocols.
But Dutta said he only wanted to save the reptile from the villagers who were readying to club it to death with sticks.
“My first instinct was to rescue the snake. I carried it on my shoulders and held its mouth firmly,” Dutta told AFP.
“I was not scared for even a moment (when the python tightened its grip) because had I panicked, it could have been fatal.”
Dutta said he did not have a bag to carry the snake, which he transported to a safe location in his car and released into the wild.