Dubai’s Crown Prince launches world’s first self-flying taxi on maiden flight

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Sheikh Hamdan poses next to the Autonomous Air Taxi (Government of Dubai)
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The Autonomous Air Taxi hovers with Dubai’s iconic Burj Khalifa in the background (Government of Dubai)
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The Autonomous Air Taxi (Government of Dubai)
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Sheikh Hamdan launches the Autonomous Air Taxi (Government of Dubai)
Updated 26 September 2017
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Dubai’s Crown Prince launches world’s first self-flying taxi on maiden flight

DUBAI: Dubai’s Crown Prince, Sheikh Hamdan, has attended the maiden flight of the world’s first self-flying taxi, but it will be at least another five years before it goes into public use.
Provided by Germany-based Volocopter, the two-seater Autonomous Air Taxi (AAT) is being introduced by Dubai’s Road and Transport Authority (RTA), it can carry two people without a human pilot.
During the ceremony Sheikh Hamdan launched the first AAT into the sky with the press of a button.
“After the remarkable success of the first driverless metro in the region, we are glad to witness today the test flight of the Autonomous Air Taxi,” Sheikh Hamdan said at Monday’s test flight.
“This is another testament to our commitment to driving positive change. We are constantly exploring opportunities to serve the community and advance the prosperity and happiness of society.”
“Encouraging innovation and adopting the latest technologies contribute not only to the country’s development but also build bridges into the future,” he added

Sheikh Hamdan said the transportation sector was important and a vital driver of the development process and an indicator of the level of advancement of the UAE. He praised the progress the country had made in this sector.
RTA Director-General and Chairman of the Board of Executive Directors, Mattar Al-Tayer said the AAT had a variety of unique features, including top security and safety standards, it is also fitted with optional emergency parachutes.

Powered by clean electricity and featuring low noise levels, the AAT is an environmentally-friendly vehicle. The current prototype version has a maximum flight time of approximately 30 minutes at a cruise speed of 50 km/h, and a maximum airspeed of 100 km/h.
But all aspects are expected to evolve as the development continues.
The AAT is about 2 meters high and the diameter of the rotor rim, including propellers, is just over 7 meters.

The flying taxi service will be available to the public through an app that will allow customers to book flights, receive booking reference details and track the route of the AAT.

Over the next five years, the RTA will collaborate with the UAE General Civil Aviation Authority and the Dubai Civil Aviation Authority to ensure that the operational requirements for implementing AAT services are put in place.
Over the five years new laws and policies governing certification of the aircraft will be developed.


India to make new bid to launch Moon rocket on Monday

Updated 18 July 2019
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India to make new bid to launch Moon rocket on Monday

  • India would become the fourth nation to land a spacecraft on the moon
  • The project is one of the cheapest amongst its kind internationally

NEW DELHI: India will make a new bid to launch a landmark mission to the Moon on Monday, a week after aborting lift-off at the last minute because of a fuel leak, officials said.
The Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) said it had rescheduled the launch of Chandrayaan-2, or Moon Chariot-2, for 2:43 p.m. (0913 GMT) on Monday.
India is aiming to become just the fourth nation after Russia, the United States and China to land a spacecraft on the Moon.
Indian space chiefs called off the planned launch of the rocket 56 minutes before blast-off on Monday morning because of what ISRO called a “technical snag.”
Media reports quoted ISRO scientists saying a helium fuel leak had been detected.
India has spent about $140 million on preparations for the project, which is one of the cheapest among international space powers.
By comparison, the United States spent about $25 billion — the equivalent of more than $100 billion in current prices — on 15 Apollo missions in the 1960s and 70s.
The rocket will launch from a space center in Sriharikota, an island off the coast of the southern state of Andhra Pradesh.
It will carry an orbiter, lander and a rover which has been almost entirely designed and made in India.
The orbiter is meant to keep circling the Moon for about one year, taking pictures of the surface and sending back information on the atmosphere.
A lander named Vikram will take the rover to the surface near the lunar South Pole.
India’s first lunar mission in 2008 — Chandrayaan-1 — did not land on the Moon, but carried out a search for water using radar.
A soft landing on the Moon would be a huge leap forward in India’s space program, with Prime Minister Narendra Modi determined to launch a manned mission into space by 2022.
India also has ambitions to land a probe on Mars. In 2014, India became only the fourth nation to put a satellite into orbit around the Red Planet.