Could this be the future first female Muslim member of the US Congress?

Fayrouz Saad
Updated 03 October 2017
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Could this be the future first female Muslim member of the US Congress?

DUBAI: America could soon see its first Muslim woman in Congress, replacing a white, male, Republican if she succeeds.
Speaking to UK website The Independent, Fayrouz Saad, said she was a supporter of providing health care coverage for all Americans, as well as creating a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants.
And she is committed to protecting environmental regulations that the Trump administration says are “bad for business.”
The 34-year-old Arab-American, whose parents migrated from Lebanon 40 years before the 9/11 attacks on the twin towers, said she had never previously experienced “much harassment or discrimination.”
But in the days after the two planes were flown into the towers, she said her parents kept her out of school, fearful of what might happen to her.
“That day, my parents came and picked me up and they took me home, because they were worried about anti-Arab and anti-Muslim backlash happening on campus,” Saad told The Independent.
She said this was the first time she “ever even realized that this was a thing – that there was a stereotype against Arabs and Muslims in this country.”
But when she did return to school a few days later she was met with a line of friends and neighbors waiting to welcome her back.
“I say that I ‘came of age’ in the post-9/11 era, because of this experience specifically,” she explained, “and really believing that this is what America is, and that this is what I want to be a part of.”
She is running for Congress in Michigan’s 11th District, hoping to replace Republican Dave Trott who has decided to stand down.
Saad said she would not be running an anti-Trump campaign, but conceded: “a lot of the things that I’m fighting for, a lot of the things I want to see changed, and a portion of what pushed me to run, is to fight back against his agenda.”
Saad’s political career started in the Obama administration after graduating from university when she joined the Obama administration’s Department of Homeland Security (DHS), where she worked on “community policing.”
While admitting she was an “Obama groupie,” she said they did not agree on everything.
“I think the great thing about our democracy is that we can love our elected leaders and respect them, but at the same time challenge some of the things that they’ve done or said,” she said.
She said it was after her time at the DHS that she became convinced of the need for a more “whole of government” approach to community policing.
She said the term “security” should include such areas like access to quality health care and education.
She classes herself as the “progressive candidate” because of her desire for government to do more, she said.
On her faith she explained: “My identity is who I am, but it’s not who I represent, or how I represent,” she said. “But it also means that I’m helping change, or at least get people to adjust, their idea of what the face of leadership looks like.”


Exhibit highlights Wellington’s formative Indian years

A handout photograph recieved in London on March 25, 2019, shows the Deccan Dinner Service, a vast silver gilt service bought by Wellington's fellow officers in the Deccan region of India as a mark of their appreciation. (AFP)
Updated 13 min 15 sec ago
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Exhibit highlights Wellington’s formative Indian years

  • The “Young Wellington in India” exhibition runs from Saturday until November 3 at Apsley House, which remains the Wellesley family’s London home, on the edge of Hyde Park

LONDON: An exhibition on the Duke of Wellington’s time in India opens in London Saturday, shedding light on formative years before he defeated French emperor Napoleon Bonaparte at the Battle of Waterloo.
Between 1796 and 1804, as the young Arthur Wellesley, he helped overthrow the Tipu Sultan and masterminded victory in the Battle of Assaye.
A decade later he defeated Napoleon, paving the way for a century of relative peace in Europe and a time of vast British imperial expansion.
The collection includes a dinner service commemorating his leadership in India that was later supplemented with cutlery taken from Napoleon’s carriage.
It also includes books from the 200-volume traveling library that, aged 27, he took with him for the six-month voyage to India in a bid to broaden his education, having finished his studies early.
It included books on India’s history, politics and economics, Jonathan Swift’s “Gulliver’s Travels” and philosophical works.
The “Young Wellington in India” exhibition runs from Saturday until November 3 at Apsley House, which remains the Wellesley family’s London home, on the edge of Hyde Park.
Charles Wellesley, 73, the ninth and current Duke of Wellington, said his great-great-great grandfather’s time in India set the stage for defeating Napoleon.
“It was very, very formative... There is no doubt that he learnt a great deal in India,” he said on Monday.
“Napoleon underestimated Wellington and the reason for this exhibition is to show how important in Wellington’s life was his period in India.”
The exhibition features swords, paintings and the Deccan Dinner Service, a vast silver gilt service bought by Wellington’s fellow officers in the Deccan region of India as a mark of their appreciation.
The cutlery for the service was taken from Napoleon after Waterloo and carries his imperial crest.
The service is still used by the family.
Josephine Oxley, keeper of the Wellington Collection, said the India years were “a time when he learned to meld the military and the political, and became skilled at negotiations with the locals.
“It’s a really interesting period of his life.”