Egypt’s ‘Sheikh Jackson’ to screen in US in 2018

Updated 18 October 2017
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Egypt’s ‘Sheikh Jackson’ to screen in US in 2018

JEDDAH: The Egyptian film drama “Sheikh Jackson” will be screened in the US in 2018.
Director Amr Salama wrote on his Instagram account: “This is a big milestone in my career, which I have always wished for. Sheikh Jackson is getting an official release in the United States early 2018.”
“Sheikh Jackson” released in all Egyptian cinemas on Oct. 4.
Salama pays homage to the late Michael Jackson in his film — a tale of how a young imam struggles to reconcile his desire to be a better Muslim with his love for the King of Pop.
The film — which landed a spot as Egypt’s Oscar bid for best foreign film — is based loosely on Salama’s own life as a former orthodox Muslim whose obsession with the flamboyant pop star caused him a crisis of faith.
The film stars Ahmed Malek as a young Khaled who adores Jackson, from his Thriller-era haircut and moon walk to his Bad tour bondage pants.
But he is eventually steered away from the man in the mirror by a macho father who fears his son becoming soft, and later by religious mentors who encourage him to preach to “those who dance to the music of the devil” to reject pop culture.
An older Khaled, played by Ahmad El-Fishawi, is torn up inside. “I don’t want to be a hypocrite,” he says in the film.
“Sheikh Jackson” was the opening movie for the first edition of El Gouna Film Festival, which took place from Sept. 22-29. The film also screened in the 61st London Film Festival, which kicked off on Oct. 4.


Japan worker’s pay docked for taking lunch 3 minutes early

Updated 21 June 2018
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Japan worker’s pay docked for taking lunch 3 minutes early

TOKYO: A Japanese city official has been reprimanded and fined for repeatedly leaving his desk during work hours — but only for around three minutes to buy lunch.
The official, who works at the waterworks bureau in the western city of Kobe, began his designated lunch break early 26 times over the space of seven months, according to a city spokesman.
“The lunch break is from noon to 1 pm. He left his desk before the break,” the spokesman said on Thursday.
The official, 64, had half a day’s pay docked as punishment and the bosses called a news conference to apologize.
“It’s deeply regrettable that this misconduct took place. We’re sorry,” a bureau official told reporters, bowing deeply.
The worker was in violation of a public service law stating that officials have to concentrate on their jobs, according to the bureau.
The news sparked a heated debate on Japanese social media, with many defending the official.
“It’s sheer madness. It’s crazy. What about leaving your desk to smoke?” said one Twitter user.
“Is this a bad joke? Does this mean we cannot even go to the bathroom?” said another.
The city had previously suspended another official in February for a month after he had left his office numerous times to buy a ready-made lunch box during work hours.
The official was absent a total of 55 hours over six months, according to the city.