3 Saudi universities receive top positions in QS rankings

King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM).
Updated 20 October 2017
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3 Saudi universities receive top positions in QS rankings

RIYADH: Three universities in the Kingdom have received top positions in the QS University Rankings for the Arab Region.
The three universities which received five-star plus rankings include King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM), King Saud University (KSU) in Riyadh and King Abdul Aziz University (KAU) in Jeddah.
Dr. Thurayya Arrayed, one of the first 30 women on the Shoura Council, said: “I am very proud of every scientific indication that our established universities are doing well and congratulate them. I am sure other universities such as KAUST are shining too.”
She said that every step Saudi Arabia takes toward excellence in its educational endeavors will be positive, and it is the need of the hour in this age of technology and research. “It is expected that our higher educational institutions should show signs of growing success in aligning their plans, performance, and projects with the National Transformation Program (NTP) 2020 and Vision 2030,” she concluded, saying that she expects better results in the near future.
Shoura Council member Dr. Fayez Al-Shehri told Arab News that the remarkable performance of the three universities bears eloquent testimony to the contributions made by the government toward higher education.
He pointed out that there are 35 universities which include 25 government institutions that receive the best support from the government to produce erudite citizens.
Describing it as excellent news, Spanish Ambassador Alvaro Iranzo Gutiérrez, who holds a degree in law said: “Education is the cornerstone of the economic development and social program.”
Bangladesh Ambassador Golam Moshi, a lawyer turned diplomat said that the achievement demonstrates a clear signal toward the road of a knowledge-based society. “The Kingdom, has been giving top priority to education for both males and females, and now it is bearing fruits,” the envoy added.
A Saudi journalist based in Dubai, Musad Al-Zayani, who follows the region for his newspaper, said this is a sign of the forward march of Saudi Arabia. “It’s a matter for rejoicing when three universities from the same country receive five-star plus ratings,” Al-Zayani, who was a product of the King Abdul Aziz University said, adding that it is because of the integrated Vision of the Kingdom, which is planned by the leadership to forge ahead in the years to come.
Congratulating the management of the three universities, Saudi writer Abdulhadi Habtor said it’s a remarkable achievement, and it clearly portrays the hard work rendered by these academic institutions.
Habtor, who was also a student at the King Abdul Aziz University said it reflects the developmental strides in Saudi Arabia toward Vision 2030. “Let us not be complacent with this situation; we should focus on other universities in the country too,” he concluded.


Disappointed fans hail improved performance by Saudi Green Falcons but defeat ends World Cup dream

Updated 21 June 2018
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Disappointed fans hail improved performance by Saudi Green Falcons but defeat ends World Cup dream

  • A fan named Yousif, who watched the match at the General Sports Authority viewing tent, was happy that the game at least was close this time.
  • Saudi Arabia will face off against Egypt, who also lost their opening two group A games against Uruguay and Russia, on June 25.

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia’s World Cup dreams were shattered after Uruguay beat the Green Falcons 1-0 in the second of the three group-stage matches. Most Saudi fans in Jeddah were much happier with the team’s performance in game two, following the resounding 5-0 defeat by host nation Russia in the opening match on June 14, but still bitterly disappointed by the loss, which means they cannot qualify for the knockout stages.

Yousif, who watched the match at the General Sports Authority viewing tent, was happy that the game at least was close this time. “Although we lost, the performance was much better than the first game with Russia. I hope we win our next match,” he said.

Nasrah, who watched the game with her two sons, said: “I was really disappointed because we played good today and nothing less than a win should have been acceptable. I am also disappointed to see the looks on my boys faces when the game ended as they were hoping for a win.”

Khalid Al-Raghbi said at least it had been a good match to watch. “We played a bit better today,” he added. “I wish we would have won but at least we performed better than our last match against Russia.”

Before the game, Ibrahim Al-Turki had been optimistic about Saudi Arabia’s chances. “We didn’t expect today’s result. I was thinking that Saudi would win by two goals, and Uruguay would score one,” he said.

The result was especially disappointing given the close result and the number of chances the Saudis had to score, said Badr, who added: “I don’t know what to tell you because we are deeply disappointed. At least if we lost with a big defeat I would say we deserved it. We had the potential but we could not score.”

Shadi Al-Ghamdi said he wished the national team’s much improved performance in their second game had been more evident in their first. “I am very proud of the players, I thought they played very well. I just wish they had played like this against Russia," he said.

Safah was less complimentary and said that the Saudi players had let their fans down, adding: “They seemed scared whenever they attempted to score any goals.”

Saudi Arabia will face off against Egypt, who also lost their opening two group A games against Uruguay and Russia, on June 25. It will be the final game in the competition for both sides, with only pride to play for, as they battle it out to see who will finish third in the group and who will be left in bottom spot.