Muslim Brotherhood founder's grandson accused of rape, sexual assault

Prof. Tariq Ramadan plans to counter Ayari’s accusations by filing his own report with the police. (Twitter: @TariqRamadan)
Updated 22 October 2017
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Muslim Brotherhood founder's grandson accused of rape, sexual assault

JEDDAH: A rape and sexual assault complaint was filed on Friday in France against Swiss Islamist and Prof. Tariq Ramadan by Henda Ayari, reported Agence France Press (AFP). 
Tariq Ramadan is the grandson of Egyptian scholar Hassan al-Banna, the founder of the Muslim Brotherhood, a group deemed terrorist by a number of Arab and Muslim countries. 
The complaint, filed with the Rouen prosecutor’s office in northwest France by Ayari, now a secular activist, detailed criminal acts of rape, sexual assault, violence, harassment and intimidation, according to a document reviewed by AFP.
The Liberators Association, of which Ayari is president, said on Facebook that she was “a victim of something very serious several years ago,” but did not reveal the name of her aggressor for safety reasons.
In her book “I Chose to be Free,” published in November 2016, she described her aggressor as Zubair. She wrote that she met him at his hotel in Paris after he had given a lecture.
“I will not give precise details of the acts he has done to me. It is enough to know that he has benefited greatly from my weakness,” Ayari wrote.
She added that when she rebelled against him at one point, he screamed at her, insulted her, slapped her and treated her violently.
“I confirm today, that the famous Zubair is Tariq Ramadan,” Ayari wrote on Facebook. Her lawyer Jonas Haddad said she did not report the assault earlier out of fear.
“After revelations over the past few days of rape and sexual assault claims in the media, Henda has decided to say what happened to her and take legal action,” he told AFP.
On Saturday, Ramadan denied Ayari's allegations and expressed his intension to sue for “slanderous denunciation” on Monday, his lawyer, Yassine Bouzrou, told French media.


Hong Kong bans pro-independence party

In this file photo taken on August 5, 2016, Andy Chan (R), leader of the pro-independence Hong Kong National Party (HKNP), gives a press conference at the start of a rally near the government's headquarters in Hong Kong. (AFP)
Updated 24 September 2018
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Hong Kong bans pro-independence party

  • The ban is likely to raise further questions about Beijing’s growing influence in the former British colony, which was promised semi-autonomy as part of the 1997 handover

HONG KONG: Authorities in Hong Kong on Monday took an unprecedented step against separatist voices by banning a political party that advocates independence for the southern Chinese territory on national security grounds.
John Lee, the territory’s secretary for security, announced that the Hong Kong National Party will be prohibited from operation from Monday.
Lee’s announcement did not provide further details. But Hong Kong’s security bureau had previously said in a letter to the National Party’s leader, 27-year-old Andy Chan, that the party should be dissolved “in the interests of national security or public safety, public order or the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.” Chan had no immediate comment.
That letter had cited a national security law that has not been invoked since 1997. The ban is likely to raise further questions about Beijing’s growing influence in the former British colony, which was promised semi-autonomy as part of the 1997 handover. Chinese President Xi Jinping and other officials have warned separatist activity would not be tolerated.
Chan, the National Party leader, had previously told The Associated Press that police approached him with documents detailing his speeches and activities since the party’s formation in 2016.
The party was founded in response to frustration about Beijing’s treatment of Hong Kong. Despite a promise of autonomy, activists complain mainland influence over its democratic elections is increasing.
Chan and other pro-independence candidates were disqualified from 2016 elections to the Hong Kong legislature after they refused to sign a pledge saying Hong Kong is an inalienable part of China. The Hong Kong National Party has never held any seats on the council.