‘Come back to negotiating table,’ Saudi ambassador urges Yemen

Mohammed Al-Jaber
Updated 29 October 2017
0

‘Come back to negotiating table,’ Saudi ambassador urges Yemen

RIYADH: The Saudi Arabian ambassador to Yemen, Mohammed Al-Jaber, has urged Yemen to open a dialogue with UN Special Envoy Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed.
Al-Jaber told Al Hayat newspaper that Saudi Arabia sees this as the best way to solve the ongoing crisis.
“Our goal now is to promote a political solution, and push the Yemeni parties to engage with the international envoy, in order to return to the negotiating table,” he said.
He added that the UN envoy “needs to first sit with the Yemeni parties to discuss all ideas, and then submit his proposals.”
In a recent statement on his Facebook page, Ahmed stated, “We are currently considering steps that each side can take to restore confidence and move forward toward a viable negotiated settlement.”
He explained that these steps are based on three pillars: “The cessation of hostilities, implementing specific confidence-building measures that will alleviate human suffering, and returning to the negotiating table with a view to reaching a comprehensive peace agreement.”
Ahmed stressed that the conflict in Yemen is essentially a political conflict “so it can only be resolved by political negotiations,” saying that he is now intensifying efforts to return to serious negotiations between all parties.
However, Yemen’s Houthi insurgents have blasted the UN envoy’s efforts, with Houthi spokesman Mohammed Abdel Salam labeling his proposals — and his attempts to impose them — “aggressive.”
Salam is particularly disappointed in the UN’s failure to re-open Sanaa airport and ease what he called “the economic and humanitarian blockade” of Yemen.


Saudi Arabia’s nuclear program ‘fundamental to Kingdom’s energy sector’

Updated 18 September 2018
0

Saudi Arabia’s nuclear program ‘fundamental to Kingdom’s energy sector’

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia’s atomic energy program is fundamental for developing a sustainable energy sector, a senior minister told the International Atomic Energy Agency on Monday.
The Kingdom plans to start building its first two nuclear power reactors this year and as many as 16 over the next 25 years at a cost of more than $80 billion. The plan is to provide 15 percent of Saudi Arabia’s power from nuclear by 2032.
Speaking at the IAEA’s annual conference in Vienna, Energy Minister Khalid Al-Falih said the atomic reactor projects were were part of the Kingdom’s Vision 2030 to diversify its energy sources to nuclear and renewables.
The program “abides by all international treaties and conventions and best practices, adhering to the highest standards of safety, security and transparency,” Al Falih said.
The minister said Saudi Arabia was committed to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, which calls for nuclear disarmament and stresses the commitment of nuclear power states to share their peaceful technologies with abiding member states.
He also said the Kingdom had called for cooperation with the international community to make the Middle East a nuclear weapons free area.
The US has started to reintroduce heavy sanctions against Iran over its nuclear program, after Donald Trump pulled out of a deal with the country earlier this year to curb its atomic ambitions.
Al-Falih called on the international community to take a more stringent stance against all threats to regional and international security, particularly Iran, given its “alarming efforts to build its nuclear capabilities, in tandem with its increasing acts of sabotage and aggression against other states in the region.”