Saudi Arabia appoints new ministers for economy and National Guard

King Salman issued royal decrees on Saturday. (SPA)
Updated 05 November 2017
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Saudi Arabia appoints new ministers for economy and National Guard

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia has appointed new ministers for the National Guard and for Economy and Planning, the Saudi Press Agency reported on Saturday, citing royal decrees.

National Guard Minister Miteb bin Abdullah was replaced by Prince Khaled bin Ayyaf, while Economy Minister Adel Fakieh was replaced by Mohammed Al-Tuwaijri.

A new anti-corruption committee was formed. The new committee will be headed by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

Joining the crown prince on the committee will be the heads of the Anti-Corruption Commission (Nazaha), Public Security, General Prosecutor and the Investigation Authority.

Commander of the Navy, Abdullah Al-Sultan, was relieved of his position and has been replaced by Fahad Al-Ghofaili.

According to the royal decree, the anti-corruption committee will perform the following tasks:

First: To identify offenses, crimes, persons, and entities involved in cases of public corruption.

Second: The investigation, issuance of arrest warrants, travel bans, disclosures and freezing of accounts and portfolios, tracking of funds, assets, and preventing their remittance or transfer by persons and entities whatever they might be. The committee has the right to take any precautionary measures it deems necessary, until they are referred to the investigating authorities or judicial bodies. It may take whatever measures it deems necessary to deal with those involved in public corruption cases and take what it considers to be the right of persons, entities, funds, fixed and movable assets, at home and abroad, return funds to the state treasury and register property and assets in the name of state property.

Third: The committee may seek the assistance of those it deems necessary and may set up teams for investigation, prosecution, etc., and may delegate some or all of its powers to these teams.

Fourth: Upon completion of its duties, the committee shall submit to us a detailed report on its findings and what action it has taken in this regard.

Fifth: The competent authorities shall be informed of this order and all parties concerned shall similarly cooperate fully to enforce the provisions of this order.


Kosovo returns families of militants from Syria

Updated 24 min 23 sec ago
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Kosovo returns families of militants from Syria

  • More than 300 Kosovo citizens, men, women and children, have traveled to Syria since 2012
  • Police said some 150 women and children, including around 60 children that were born in war zones, were captured

PRISTINA: Dozens of women and children, relatives of Kosovo militants fighting in Syria, were flown back home by plane on Saturday under heavy security.
“The planned operation for the return of some of our citizens from Syria has ended successfully,” Justice Minister Abelrad Tahiri said at the airport early on Saturday.
Details would be released later in the day, he said.
After hours at the airport, two buses with women and children were transported under police escort to army barracks just outside Pristina.
More than 300 Kosovo citizens, men, women and children, have traveled to Syria since 2012. Some 70 men who fought alongside extremist militant groups were killed.
Police said some 150 women and children, including around 60 children that were born in war zones, were captured as Daesh lost ground.
It remained unclear if all of them were returned on Friday. Neither the minister nor police gave any details if any fighters were also returned.
International and local security agencies have previously warned of the risk posed by returning fighters. In 2015, Kosovo adopted a law making fighting in foreign conflicts punishable by up to 15 years in jail.
Kosovo’s population is nominally 90 percent Muslim, but largely secular in outlook.
There have been no Islamist attacks on its soil, although more than 100 men have been jailed or indicted on charges of fighting in Syria and Iraq. Some of them were found guilty of planning attacks in Kosovo.
The government said a form of radical Islam had been imported to Kosovo by non-governmental organizations from the Middle East after the end of its 1998-99 war of secession from Serbia.