Rescue teams pull child’s body from septic tank in Jeddah

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(Civil Defense)
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(Civil Defense)
Updated 10 November 2017
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Rescue teams pull child’s body from septic tank in Jeddah

JEDDAH: A child’s body has been pulled from a septic tank in the early hours of Friday morning after the four-year-old boy was reported missing in the Makkah region, a civil defense spokesman has confirmed.

The boy’s body was found by members of the National Center for Joint Security Operations (NCSO), Jeddah's Civil Defense spokesman Col. Saeed Sarhan said.

“Rescue teams in Jeddah rushed to the location and began working on pulling the child out of the septic tank, which is two meters deep and filled with one meter of water, adjacent to a fenced courtyard,” he added,

“Rescue teams jumped into the septic tank through its nozzle.”

The child’s family had reported him missing on Wednesday.

The boy was pronounced dead by members of the Red Crescent, before being transferred to a hospital.

There have been similar deaths in Jeddah in recent years, including a man who died as he tried to pull his child – who also died – out of a sewer on Tahlia Street.

Other fatalities have included a teenager who fell in a storm drain, an Egyptian child who died in a sewer nozzle, a Yemeni child who fell in a storm drain on his way home from school, and a girl who slipped into a sewer.


‘Our History is Misk’ revive 20 traditional professional figures in Jeddah

Cafes were an important part of Jeddah’s social life. (AN photo)
Updated 4 min 23 sec ago
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‘Our History is Misk’ revive 20 traditional professional figures in Jeddah

  • Cafes were an important part of Jeddah’s social life

JEDDAH: “Our History is Misk,” supported by the Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman bin Abdul Aziz Foundation, is being organized at the historical site of Jeddah.
The event is bringing nostalgia through a number of scenes that embody the life the city witnessed decades ago.
It comes as one of the activities of the foundation’s initiatives center and is part of its role in encouraging creativity and promoting national values in society.
The activities include an open theater to portray the professions of Jeddah citizens in the past. A number of local actors brought 20 extinct professions back to life through their performances.
One of the actors sits in the center, playing the role of the mayor, who used to help the people and solved their differences. Also showcased were the “decorator,” who is similar to barbers nowadays, the distribution of fabrics used in houses at the time, the selling of water in alleys for nominal amounts of money, and the restoration and cleaning of shoes.
Cafes were an important part of Jeddah’s social life. In them, people with all kinds of professions met to drink tea and listen to a storyteller.