Lahore-based tech, culture and art show draws savvy crowds

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The event brought together the worlds of fashion, art, food, tech and music. (Photo courtesy: Zainab Tariq/The Mix)
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(Photo courtesy: Zainab Tariq/The Mix)
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(Photo courtesy: Zainab Tariq/The Mix)
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(Photo courtesy: Zainab Tariq/The Mix)
Updated 15 November 2017
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Lahore-based tech, culture and art show draws savvy crowds

LAHORE: Inspired by the Texas-based South by Southwest (SXSW) festival, Pakistan was treated to its very own tech and culture event this past weekend.
Dubbed “The Mix,” the festival was held on Nov. 11 and 12 at the iconic Al-Hamra stadium in Lahore and was hosted by the Punjab IT Board (PITB). The event brought together the worlds of fashion, art, food, tech and music.
Arab News spoke to Zainab Tariq, one of the planners behind the event who, along with team mate Sarah Ansari, curated the event.
“The Mix was inspired by the famed South by Southwest (SXSW) festival that happens every year in Austin, Texas,” Tariq said. “It bridges gaps between technology, culture, food, music, theater, art — everything.”
“The chairman of the PITB, Umar Saif, met with the SXSW team earlier this year, after their meeting it was decided that for sure the concept should be launched in Lahore,” Tariq added.
The purpose of the event went further than an entertaining weekend, however. “The Mix was to actually showcase how, in Lahore specifically, technology is becoming a hub or an intervention to solve all problems, be it ride hailing, food delivery, music, health and even digital advertising.’
The events included hands on Virtual Reality demos, art exhibitions and talks from various industry leaders who are diving into the world of tech to facilitate their businesses or outreach. “The conversations and the participants were filtered through people who were working in these specific industries and those of them who are most technically able were brought on board.”
With foot traffic that brought in estimates of 2,000 to 3,000 people at any one time, showing the everyday technology user what they could be accomplishing was another goal. “Technology is evolving every industry and we wanted to showcase to the average man that they could use a smartphone for so much more than they do at the moment. (We hoped to) eradicate the hesitation they have for example in paying their bills through an app.”
“The partners that we locked down were instantly convinced to be involved… they invest so much in their technical and digital platforms and they don’t get the highlight that they should be getting. It’s their own hustle to get out there so to have a platform where they can stand alongside established brands like Careem, or TCS, Patari, Mango Baaz and Booking.pk is incredible,” Tariq added.
The festival itself was a reminder that Pakistan, like most of the world, is embracing technology. Whether it is launching your own business, catching a ride or finding information at the touch of a finger, businesses and culture will continue to be shaped by changing technologies.


’Blurred Lines’ legal saga ends in $5mn ruling favoring Marvin Gaye family

Updated 14 December 2018
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’Blurred Lines’ legal saga ends in $5mn ruling favoring Marvin Gaye family

  • “The verdict handicaps any creator out there who is making something that might be inspired by something else,” Pharell Williams said
  • The initial award in the case had triggered an angry response from many songwriters, who argued that there were major differences between the two songs at the center of the legal battle

LOS ANGELES: A long-running copyright dispute over the smash hit “Blurred Lines” has ended with the family of Motown legend Marvin Gaye winning a nearly $5 million judgment against Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams.
Thicke and Williams had been accused by Gaye’s estate of copyright infringement for their 2013 hit because of similarities with the late singer’s “Got to Give It Up.”
In 2015, the estate was awarded more than $7 million but the amount was later reduced to $5.3 million
Thicke and Pharrell appealed that judgment and a California judge earlier this year overall upheld the jury’s decision.
In a December 6 final ruling in the case made public on Thursday, US District Judge John Kronstadt ordered Thicke, Williams and Williams’ publishing company to pay Gaye’s estate $2.9 million in damages, US media reported.
Thicke was ordered to pay an additional $1.76 million. Williams and his publishing company must also separately pay Gay’s estate nearly $360,000.
Gaye’s family was also rewarded 50 percent of the song’s royalties.
The verdict caps a long-drawn legal battle that was closely watched by the music industry.
The initial award in the case had triggered an angry response from many songwriters, who argued that there were major differences between the two songs at the center of the legal battle, including the melodies and lyrics.
Williams, a popular songwriter who had another smash hit with “Happy,” said in an interview in 2015 that all creative people had inspirations.
“The verdict handicaps any creator out there who is making something that might be inspired by something else,” he said at the time.
“If we lose our freedom to be inspired, we’re going to look up one day and the entertainment industry as we know it will be frozen in litigation.”
Representatives of both Williams and Thicke could not be immediately reached for comment.