SoftBank tipped for $25bn KSA investment in ‘unique’ deal

SoftBank plans to deploy up to $15 billion in the new high-tech city of NEOM. (Reuters)
Updated 16 November 2017
0

SoftBank tipped for $25bn KSA investment in ‘unique’ deal

LONDON: SoftBank’s reported plan to invest $25 billion in Saudi Arabia would be a “unique” move, a Riyadh-based economist has said.
The Japanese group, which is headed by Masayoshi Son, plans to invest the funds in Saudi Arabia over the next three to four years, Bloomberg reported on Wednesday, citing people familiar with the matter.
SoftBank plans to deploy up to $15 billion in the new high-tech city of Neom, with its $100 billion Vision Fund planning an investment of as much as $10 billion in Saudi Electricity, Bloomberg reported.
John Sfakianakis, director of economic research at the Gulf Research Center in Riyadh, said the reported investment would be “unique” as KSA is a co-investor in the Vision Fund.
“Here we have some of the money that Saudi Arabia invested in Vision finding its way back to the donor country, helping the Kingdom to invest in key evolving technologies, and boosting the economy overall,” said Sfakianakis.
The move would be part and parcel of what SoftBank indicated at last month’s Future Investment Initiative in Riyadh, added Sfakianakis.
SoftBank representatives made it clear then that they wanted to reinvest money from the Vision Fund into KSA, as the country looks to diversify its economy and reduce its dependence on oil, he said.
At the same time, the Vision Fund’s investment philosophy underlines Son’s belief in a future that he believes will be dominated by robotics and artificial intelligence.
Its investments so far have spanned robotics software start-ups like Brain Corp. and business software maker Slack. SoftBank has also been involved in a plan to buy a fifth of the existing stock of Uber — the company that has disrupted the transportation industry. With plans for Neom to be at the forefront of robotics and AI, the planned $500 billion megacity is an an obvious target for Son and SoftBank, said Sfakianakis.
Besides SoftBank and the Saudi wealth fund, investors in the Vision Fund include the sovereign wealth fund of Abu Dhabi, Apple and Foxconn. The Vision Fund announced in May it had raised over $93 billion from investors to fund ventures in areas such as AI and robotics.
Saudi Arabia previously announced plans to sell a large minority stake in Saudi Electricity to the Vision Fund but the figures have not been made public.
SoftBank did not respond to a request for comment on the Bloomberg report. Representatives of Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund (PIF), the investor in the Vision Fund, did not provide a comment.


Urgency needed to boost Palestinian economy: IMF chief

Updated 26 June 2019
0

Urgency needed to boost Palestinian economy: IMF chief

  • The MF has been warning of severe deterioration in the Palestinian economy
  • ‘If there is an economic plan, if there is urgency, it’s a question of making sure that the momentum is sustained’

MANAMA: IMF chief Christine Lagarde said Wednesday that major economic growth was possible in the Palestinian territories if all sides showed urgency, as she took part in a US-led conference boycotted by the Palestinian leadership.
The International Monetary Fund has been warning of severe deterioration in the Palestinian economy, with tax revenue blocked in a dispute with Israel which has also imposed a crippling blockade on the Gaza Strip for more than a decade.
“If there is an economic plan, if there is urgency, it’s a question of making sure that the momentum is sustained,” said Lagarde.
The IMF chief is attending a conference in Bahrain to discuss the economic aspects of a United States plan for Israeli-Palestinian peace, which has already been rejected by the Palestinians as it fails to address key political issues.
Lagarde said for the US plan to work “it will require all the goodwill in the world on the part of all parties — private sector, public sector, international organizations and the parties on the ground and their neighbors.”
Citing examples of post-conflict countries, Lagarde said that private investors needed progress in several sectors including strengthening the central bank, better managing public finance and mobilizing domestic revenue.
“If anti-corruption is really one of the imperatives of the authorities — as it was in Rwanda, for instance — then things can really take off,” she said.
The plan presented by White House adviser Jared Kushner calls for $50 billion of investment in the Palestinian territories and its neighbors within a decade.
The proposals for infrastructure, tourism, education and more aim to create one million Palestinian jobs.
Gross domestic product in the Gaza Strip declined by eight percent last year, while there was only minor growth in the West Bank.
Kushner, opening the conference on Tuesday, called the plan the “Opportunity of the Century” — and said the Palestinians needed to accept it before a deal can be reached on political solutions.
The Palestinian Authority has rejected the conference, saying that the US and Israel are trying to dangle money to impose their ideas on a political settlement.
Washington says it will unveil the political aspects of its peace deal at a later date, most likely after Israel’s September election.