Nissan GT-R/C races at Silverstone without a driver

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The Silverado Centennial Special Edition
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The Nissan GT-R /C
Updated 19 November 2017
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Nissan GT-R/C races at Silverstone without a driver

Nissan GB has created the ultimate remote-control car for gamers — the Nissan GT-R /C. Celebrating the release of Gran Turismo Sport, out in Europe, and marking 20 years of Nissan involvement in the Gran Turismo gaming series, the one-off project car was extensively modified to be driven entirely by a DualShock 4 controller. A few millimeters of button or joystick movement are all it takes to unleash the GT-R’s full power. The remote-control vehicle is capable of a top speed of 196mph. The GT-R /C was
put through its paces around Silverstone’s National Circuit     by NISMO racing driver Jann Mardenborough. Mardenborough controlled the GT-R /C from the cockpit of a Robinson R44 Raven II helicopter, which had been given special permission to operate at a low altitude.
 With the recent destruction of a major haul of fake spare parts by authorities in Ajman, United Arab Emirates, premium aftermarket supplier ACDelco is highlighting the dangers of purchasing counterfeit parts and warning Middle East customers to be vigilant. While fake parts may often be less expensive to buy, the cost can prove to be far higher in the long run, and not just financially. Imitation parts typically do not last as long as genuine parts. These parts are not built to a particular car’s specifications, which can also lead to mechanical problems and breakdowns. Worst of all, fake auto parts are not made to exacting standards, which can have significant safety implications, especially when buying parts such as brakes.
 Electric vehicles will get a boost with pan-European charging network IONITY’s launch of 400 High Power Charging (HPC) stations by 2020, making long-distance journeys easier. Based in Munich, the joint venture is led by Chief Executive Officer Michael Hajjesch and has a growing team, set to number 50 by the start of 2018. “The first pan-European HPC network plays an essential role in establishing a market for electric vehicles. It will provide customers with fast charging and digital payment capability to facilitate long-distance travel,” Hajjesch said. A total of 20 stations will be opened to the public this year, located on major roads in Germany, Norway and Austria, at intervals of 120 km. Throughout 2018, the network will expand to more than 100 stations, each one enabling multiple customers to charge their vehicles simultaneously.

Model year 2018 marks the 100th anniversary of the first production of the Chevrolet truck, and Chevrolet Middle East celebrated this milestone with the launch of the 2018 Silverado Centennial Special Edition at the Dubai International Motor Show. “The Silverado is an icon in the region and as we celebrate the 100th anniversary of Chevrolet Trucks, we are proud to bring the Centennial Edition to the Middle East. This special edition Silverado is a fitting nod to the rich heritage of Chevrolet trucks globally, and we look forward to sharing it with our most loyal Chevrolet fans in this very special year,” said Ahmed Soudodi, head of Brand, Chevrolet Middle East.


Saudi energy minister compares electric vehicle ‘hype’ to peak oil misconceptions

Updated 15 October 2018
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Saudi energy minister compares electric vehicle ‘hype’ to peak oil misconceptions

  • Khalid Al-Falih on Monday questioned what he described as the “hype” of the electric vehicle market
  • Compared it to past misconceptions around the theory of peak oil

LONDON: Saudi Energy Minister Khalid Al-Falih on Monday questioned what he described as the “hype” of the electric vehicle market and compared it to past misconceptions around the theory of peak oil.
He told the CERAWeek energy gathering by IHS Markit in New Delhi that petrol and diesel engines would co-exist with emerging electric and hydrogen fuel cell technologies for much longer than widely expected.
Miscalculations around the pace of electrification could create “serious” risks around global energy security, he said.
“Conventional vehicles today, despite all the hype, represent 99.8 percent of the global vehicle fleet. That means electric vehicles with 0.2 percent of the fleet, only substitute about 30,000 barrels per day of oil equivalent of a total global oil demand of about 100 million barrels.
“Even if those numbers increase by a factor of 100 over the next couple of decades, they would still remain negligible in the global energy mix.”
He said: “History tells us that orderly energy transformations are a complex phenomenon involving generational time frames as opposed to quick switches that could lead to costly setbacks.”
In another broadside aimed at electric vehicles, the Saudi energy minister highlighted past misconceptions about global energy demand growth — and specifically the notion of “peak oil.”
“I remember thought leaders within the industry telling us that oil demand will peak at 95 million barrels per day. Had we listened to them and not invested . . . imagine the tight spot we would be in today.”
“Let’s also remember that in many parts of the world, roughly three fourths of the electricity, which would also power electric vehicles, is currently generated by coal, including here in India. So you could think of any electric vehicle running in the streets of Delhi as essentially being a coal-powered automobile.”
“When it comes to renewables, the fundamental challenge of battery storage remains unresolved — a factor that is essential to the intermittency issue impacting wind and solar power. Therefore the more realistic narrative and assessment is that electric vehicles and renewables will continue to make technological and economic progress and achieve greater market penetration — but at a relatively gradual rate and as a result, conventional energy will be with us for a long, long time to come.”