Saudi cybersecurity conference to fight increasing threats

Saudis attend the second International Cyber Security Conference, in Riyadh, in this February 27, 2017 photo. (AFP)
Updated 25 November 2017
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Saudi cybersecurity conference to fight increasing threats

RIYADH: The Ministry of Interior, represented by the National Cyber Security Center (NCSC), will host the third International Cyber Security Conference (ICSC) in Riyadh early next year aiming to combat increasing cyber threats.
To be organized in March by the NCSC in partnership with Naseba, the conference aims to successfully combat the increased cyber threats targeting the Kingdom, particularly in recent times, through developing relevant standards, policies and the legal framework, sharing and disseminating critical information and alerts, and most importantly creating further education and fostering awareness among cybersecurity stakeholders, said the media department of the Ministry of Communication and Information Technology.

Besides knowledge sharing and fostering relationships, one of the main objectives of the upcoming conference is to introduce stakeholders and attendees to providers of cybersecurity solutions and services, it added.

According to the ministry, up to 1,000 delegates, comprising VIPs, CEOs, CIOs, CISOs, IT and security managers, and young security aspirants, including students, will participate in the annual conference.

The conference, considered one of the largest of its kind in the region that addresses cybersecurity in different ways, will help facilitate national, regional and international collaboration between government, industry and critical cyber infrastructure organizations.

The ICSC will also feature investors who want to diversify their portfolios into international companies, particularly in the cybersecurity sectors where innovation could benefit the regional cyber-defense capacity.

With the Kingdom rapidly developing and diversifying its economy as part of Vision 2030, an important element of this new forward-looking economic plan is information and communications technology (ICT), but the widespread use of ICT heightens the risk of cybersecurity threats from hackers, hacktivists, insiders, organized criminals and even foreign governments.

In order to successfully combat these threats, the Kingdom needs to develop relevant standards, policies and the legal framework, share and disseminate critical information and alerts, and most importantly, create further education and awareness among cybersecurity stakeholders.

The NCSC, as part of the Ministry of Interior, is at the forefront of the cybersecurity defense initiative in the Kingdom and develops and manages the national strategic direction for cybersecurity in collaboration with government agencies, including the concerned ministries.


Saudi crown prince calls for establishing health center dedicated to Pakistani hero

Updated 37 min 14 sec ago
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Saudi crown prince calls for establishing health center dedicated to Pakistani hero

  • The directive was issued during the crown prince’s visit to Pakistan on the first leg of his Asia tour
  • Khan managed to save 14 lives, but he drowned as he attempted to rescue the 15th person.

DUBAI: Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has called for the creation of a health center in Pakistan’s Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province dedicated to the memory of a Pakistani hero who saved 14 lives in Jeddah’s 2009 floods, Saudi state-news agency SPA reported.

The directive was issued during the crown prince’s visit to Pakistan on the first leg of his Asia tour.

In November 2009, as flash floods roared through the port city, Farman Ali Khan secured a rope to his waist and jumped into the water to rescue people.

He managed to save 14 lives, but he drowned as he attempted to rescue the 15th person.

He was posthumously awarded the King Abdul Aziz Medal of the First Order by the Saudi government and Pakistan’s Tamgha-e-Shujat by then President Asif Ali Zardari. 

“What this man displayed is a rare act of heroism,” said Rania Khaled, an account executive in Jeddah. “He didn’t pause to think of where these people came from or their nationality — all he cared about was that everyone survived the terrible flood. As a result, he lost his life and that’s what makes his tale so heroic. He cared for humanity, not just his own well-being and safety.
“He set a very high example of what a human should aspire to be. Your background, race and nationality shouldn’t matter; what matters is that we all stand together and help each other. I think if people lived with a similar mindset to that of Khan, the world would be a better place.”
Razan Sijjeeni, a photography instructor in Jeddah, said: “I think what Khan did was not only heroic but also human. It says a lot about the kind of person he was in that moment when he chose to risk his life to save others. He gives us a lot to reflect on — who we are today and how much we should value human lives that are not necessarily related to us.”
Nora Al-Rifai, who is training to be a life coach, said that she hopes Khan’s widow and three daughters continue to receive the help and support they deserve.
“It’s a nice gesture that a Jeddah street was named after him as a reminder to all of us and the next generations of his selflessness and heroism.”