Call for flexible hours for working Saudi women

A scientific session in progress at the Riyadh Economic Forum (REF), which concluded in Riyadh on Wednesday. (AN photo)
Updated 29 November 2017
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Call for flexible hours for working Saudi women

RIYADH: The private sector should offer working women flexible working hours and a conducive working environment, the 8th Riyadh Economic Forum was told on Wednesday.
Flexible hours should be arranged to empower women and give them a place for employment in private and public sectors, the forum heard.
The three-day forum sponsored by the Riyadh Chamber of Commerce and Industry (RCCI) was inaugurated by Riyadh Gov. Prince Faisal bin Bandar on Monday. RCCI Chairman Ahmed B. Al-Rajhi, on behalf of the board of directors and the business sectors, expressed his appreciation to King Salman for extending his patronage for the forum.
Al-Rajhi also thanked the Riyadh governor, honorary president of the forum, for his support for and interest in the forum’s activities. More than 300 delegates from the public and private sectors attended the event.
Reading out the final recommendations of the forum, the vice president of the Board of Trustees of the Forum, Ali Al-Othaim, particularly emphasized the provision of flexible working hours for women, which should empower women and give them the chance of work in both sectors.
Recommendations also included formulating a special legal framework governing and regulating the partnership process between public, private, local and foreign investment, developing a national corporate governance program to revise existing regulations and establishing complexes for integration between intermediate mainstream and manufacturing industries.
The house also recommended the establishment of specialized technical institutes in the field of mining to graduate qualified personnel to fill the shortage in the fields of exploration, extraction, and metal processing.
It was also urged to establish “mineral cities” (where there is an abundance of minerals) to achieve integration between the intermediate metallurgical and manufacturing industries.
It was felt that there was a pressing need to improve the efficiency of local human resources at professional and academic levels to cater to the local labor market.
It was urged to enhance the volume of credit facilities to the private sector by establishing financing funds that will contribute to supporting investments in the manufacturing and ICT sectors, and encourage them to attract talents and skilled labor and develop the capabilities of the current workforce.
Finally, it was said the work culture should be instilled in the minds of young people at school and that they should be made to work in part-time jobs during their school holidays.


Hollywood star Cuba Gooding Jr. shares career at Saudi Film Festival

Updated 10 min 59 sec ago
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Hollywood star Cuba Gooding Jr. shares career at Saudi Film Festival

  • He said he hopes to support Saudi filmmakers through his recently launched production company
  • The festival, at Ithra, is part of the Sharqiah Season in the Eastern Province

DHAHRAN: Oscar-winning actor Cuba Gooding Jr. talked about his experiences in Hollywood, and the challenges he has faced during his career, when he appeared on Monday night at the fifth Saudi Film Festival, which is part of the Sharqiah Season in the Eastern Province.
Known for his roles in movies such as “Men of Honor”, “A Few Good Men” and “American Crime Story,” among others, he has appeared in more than 85 films during a 30-year career on screen and stage. He won the Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his performance in the 1996 film “Jerry Maguire,” alongside Tom Cruise and Renee Zellweger.
Gooding Jr. arrived for the event, at the King Abdul Aziz World Center for Culture (Ithra), accompanied by Claudine De Niro, the estranged wife of actor Robert De Niro’s son, Raphael. They were greeted by renowned Saudi film producer and Hollywood businessman Mohammed Al-Turki.
Gooding Jr. spoke to the audience at Ithra for almost 60 minutes about his long career and the challenges and pitfalls he had experienced on the road to success in the film industry. He also offered some advice to anyone interested in following in his footsteps.
“No one prepares you for success,” he said. “That’s why you see a lot of actors that star in movies, then disappear. Or you see athletes that make a $100 million and then they disappear, too. They weren’t ready for it.
“You have to envision yourself standing on that stage, holding an Oscar over your head, saying, ‘This is for the Middle-East’. You have to envision the script that you will write and envision being on that stage, holding that Oscar.
“People asked me after I won that Academy Award if I ever thought I would be on that stage. I always said, ‘Not in a million years.’ But that’s a lie. You have to envision yourself on that stage, winning that award, so that when you succeed it will feel normal, not like it’s something special, so that you can do it again.”
The actor also said that he intends to support filmmakers from Saudi Arabia and other countries through his recently launched production company.
Asked if he had any projects planned in the region, and Saudi Arabia in particular, he said: “I do, actually. I have a couple of things. I don’t want to give it away but let’s just say that there is a lot of great literature that I’ve read, a lot of different books, including Arabian Nights. It’s hard to talk about the things in development because you don’t want to give it away but there is definitely something in development.”