Yemen rebel infighting in Sanaa leaves 14 dead: medics

Houthi supporters hold their weapons as they attend a gathering ahead of the birth anniversary of the Prophet Muhammad in Sanaa, Yemen Nov. 28, 2017. (Reuters/Khaled Abdullah)
Updated 30 November 2017
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Yemen rebel infighting in Sanaa leaves 14 dead: medics

SANAA: Clashes in Yemen’s capital between Shiite Houthi terrorists and loyalists of former president Ali Abdullah Saleh left 14 people dead Wednesday, medics and officials said.
The fighting erupted around Sanaa’s central Saleh mosque, Yemen’s largest, as Houthis tried to seize it ahead of Thursday’s celebration of the Prophet Muhammad’s birthday, they said.
“The Houthis attempted to take control of the mosque in anticipation of a rally on Thursday in the adjacent square,” said an official from Saleh’s General People’s Congress, asking not to be named.
The mosque’s guards, who were Saleh supporters, resisted, triggering a gunfight between the two camps, the GPC official said.
The shootout then spread to nearby districts controlled by Saleh loyalists.
The official said four Saleh supporters were killed on the spot and a fifth died of his wounds later in hospital.
Nine Houthi fighters also died in the fighting, according to officials at two hospitals in the capital.
Rebel chief Abdulmalik Al-Houthi had on Wednesday urged supporters across the country to head to Sanaa for the rally.
For decades sworn enemies, nationalist forces loyal to Saleh and the Iran-backed Shiite Houthis joined ranks in 2014 to drive the government of President Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi out of Sanaa.
That prompted a Saudi-led coalition to intervene the following year to prop up Hadi’s government.
The war has since killed some 8,600 people, while a further 2,000 have died of cholera.
Despite a crippling coalition blockade, the Houthis and Saleh’s forces continue to jointly control Sanaa, but tensions between them have escalated since a public dispute in August.
The Houthis accused Saleh of treason after the former president publicly dismissed the Iran-backed rebels as “militias.”
Saleh’s GPC party last month accused the Houthis of waging an “orchestrated campaign” against the former strongman and lacking “the will to maintain partnership.”
The Houthis responded that the GPC had broken its pact by accepting funds from Hadi’s government.


13 killed, dozens hurt in latest bout of Tripoli fighting, says Libyan ministry

Members of the Tripoli Protection Force, an alliance of militias from the capital city, patrol an area south of the Libyan capital on January 18, 2019, during clashes with the Seventh Brigade group from the town of Tarhuna. (AFP)
Updated 35 min 12 sec ago
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13 killed, dozens hurt in latest bout of Tripoli fighting, says Libyan ministry

  • The Libyan National Army faction said it killed Abu Talha Al-Libi, a commander in Al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, and two other militants near the city of Sabha

BENGHAZI: Libya’s Health Ministry said fighting in the capital Tripoli between rival militias has left 13 people dead.
The ministry said late Friday that 52 people were injured in the fighting which flared up Wednesday, shattering a UN-brokered cease-fire reached in September that ended hostilities in the city.
The earlier bout of violence killed nearly 100 people.
In a statement, the ministry appealed to rival militiamen not to target ambulances and medics.
The fighting between militias allied to the UN-backed government in Tripoli and an armed group from a nearby town underscores Libya’s lingering lawlessness since the 2011 uprising that toppled and killed Muammar Qaddafi.
Al-Qaeda and Daesh have been using southern Libya as a base for attacks in Libya and neighboring countries, exploiting a security vacuum since 2011.
Meanwhile, Eastern Libyan forces have said they had killed a senior Al-Qaeda figure in southern Libya, during an operation to secure oil and gas assets and fight militants in the lawless south.
The Libyan National Army (LNA) faction said it killed Abu Talha Al-Libi, a commander in Al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), and two other militants near the city of Sabha, LNA spokesman Ahmed Mismari said.
The energy-rich North African nation is governed by rival authorities in Tripoli and the country’s east, each of which is backed by an array of militias.