Dhaka welcomes robot waiters

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Customers watch in awe as a robot waiter serves food at the launch of the Mexwel Robot Restaurant in Dhaka. (AN photo)
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Customers watch in awe as a robot waiter serves food at the launch of the Mexwel Robot Restaurant in Dhaka. (AN photo)
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A robot waitress serves food at the launch of the Mexwel Robot Restaurant in Dhaka. (AN photo)
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Unlike human waiters, robot waiters need the customers to take the food that they serve. (AN photo)
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A robot waiter seems to have fun being included in a selfie shot as she serves food at the launch of the Mexwel Robot Restaurant in Dhaka. (AN photo)
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A robot waiter seems to mind its own business as a man takes a selfie with the robot nearby. (AN photo)
Updated 01 December 2017
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Dhaka welcomes robot waiters

DHAKA: The use of two robots as waiters in a Dhaka restaurant is causing much excitement and amusement among customers and residents.

“I can’t believe my eyes — human-like robots are serving me food!” said Shahrin, 9.

The Mexwel Robot Restaurant, located near the prime minister’s official residence, was opened at a joint ceremony with HZX Electronic Technology Co., the Chinese manufacturer of the robots.

On the opening day, some 300 customers were served. “We’re getting food as well as fun with the robots,” said customer Rehana Begum.

The robots have in their memory a sketch of the restaurant interior, with the tables identified by numbers.

“We have one male and one female robot. We’re yet to name them,” Rahin Raiyan, director of the restaurant, told Arab News. “Each robot cost us around $10,000.”

The restaurant can serve 100 people at a time. “Our main goal is to make this unique initiative sustainable by serving good-quality food,” said Raiyan.

WATCH: Customers revel as robot waiters serve at Dhaka restaurant
 


King Abdul Aziz City for Science and Technology unveils self-guided Black Shark boat at 38th GITEX Technology Week

The development of the Black Shark smart boat is part of a KACST initiative to localize and transform transport technology and logistics, to help achieve the aims of Vision 2030. (SPA)
Updated 20 October 2018
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King Abdul Aziz City for Science and Technology unveils self-guided Black Shark boat at 38th GITEX Technology Week

  • These trucks are equipped with electronic pairing technologies, which effectively improve the shipping and distributing of goods, reduce human error

JEDDAH: King Abdul Aziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) has unveiled its Black Shark self-guided boat at the 38th GITEX Technology Week in Dubai. The vessel, which can carry out coastal surveillance and many other tasks, was developed in collaboration with Taqnia for Robotics and Smart Systems.
The development of the craft is part of a KACST initiative to localize and transform transport technology and logistics, to help achieve the aims of Vision of 2030.
The boat includes sensor systems that allow it to monitor and create a 3D map of a 200-meter area surrounding the boat, and automated control technology that gives it the ability to navigate independently and avoid collisions without human input. It can also be equipped with a flexible range of weapons, acting as a firearms platform that uses gyroscopic self-balancing technology. It has the ability to survey beaches at a range of 15 kilometers, in addition to accurately identifying its precise location with a margin of error of less than 20 centimeters using differential GPS, as well as specifying, monitoring and tracking targets.
The Black Shark also has long-range radar that covers up to 150 kilometers, and a telecommunication system to track its location, monitor its status and connect to multiple domains through command centers that allow wireless communication and remote control. It is fitted with a digital camera powered by electro-optic and infrared technology that can produce HD-quality video, and also has night vision capability.
As part of its initiative to develop transport technology and logistics, KACST has also worked on automated control technology, included self-driving heavy-duty trucks, with the University of California, Berkeley. These trucks are equipped with electronic pairing technologies, which effectively improve the shipping and distributing of goods, reduce human error, preserve resources, and reduce harmful emissions and fuel consumption.
The same technology can also, for example, transform a four-wheel-drive vehicle into a remote-controlled vehicle equipped with video cameras, infrared technology, a microphone and a control device wirelessly connected to a command center, where an operator can guide it using images from the video cameras.