KSRelief launches 2nd phase of program to rehabilitate Yemen’s child soldiers

KSRelief workers distribute food baskets for displaced people at a refugee center in Yemen on Nov. 29, 2017. (SPA)
Updated 04 December 2017
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KSRelief launches 2nd phase of program to rehabilitate Yemen’s child soldiers

RIYADH: Forty children from Taiz in Yemen and Amman, Jordan, recruited by Houthi militias to become child soldiers, are undergoing rehabilitation as part of the second stage of the Child Soldiers Rehabilitation Project.
During the first stage of the program, the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Centre (KSRelief) also provided rehabilitative services to another 40 children, including those from Marib, Yemen, and Al-Jawf in Libya. “They will receive psychological, social, cultural and sports services and activities for a period of one month,” KSRelief said on its website.
The child soldiers, who were illegally recruited by Houthi militias to fight in the ongoing conflict, are being rehabilitated at the Community Rehabilitation Center in Marib.
The initiative, called Child Soldiers Rehabilitation Project, is described as “a qualitative program and a major achievement in the country’s crisis.”
KSRelief added that the children will also receive educational assistance to help them re-enter school and continue their disrupted studies.
It said relatives will also take part in programs to help children reintegrate into their respective families and communities.
Concerned families expressed their appreciation for KSRelief’s initiatives “to address the overall plight of the children who are used as pawns in armed conflicts.”
KSRelief added that various services had been given to more than 2,000 child soldiers in Yemen so that they could recover from their ordeals. Since 2015, KSRelief has spent more than $262 million on child development programs through 116 projects.
Earlier, Abdullah Al-Rwaily, KSRelief’s director of community support services, told Arab News that the center had organized rehabilitation for about 20,000 child soldiers in Yemen.
He said that there were four training centers where these children were being rehabilitated.
He also called for the participation of non-governmental organizations in the programs, warning that without such aid the situation could become similar to that in Afghanistan.


Al-Jubeir: Saudi-led coalition ‘working with UN to end Yemen conflict’

The Houthis should engage in the political process and respond to the will of the international community to end the war and end the coup against the legitimate government, said Saudi Arabia's foreign minister. (AFP)
Updated 45 min 43 sec ago
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Al-Jubeir: Saudi-led coalition ‘working with UN to end Yemen conflict’

  • Since day one, we said that the solution… is a political solution, says Saudi FM
  • Al-Jubeir: Saudi Arabia is the largest provider of humanitarian aid to Yemen, providing more than $13 billion since the start of the conflict

RIYADH: The Saudi-led coalition is working with UN envoy Martin Griffith to reach a political solution to the conflict in Yemen based on UN Security Council resolution 2216, the Gulf Initiative and the outcomes of Yemeni national dialogue, the Saudi foreign minister said on Thursday. 

“Since day one, we said that the solution… is a political solution, and the solution should lead to the restoration of legitimacy in Yemen,” said Adel Al-Jubeir.

“We support a peaceful solution in Yemen. We support the efforts of the UN envoy for the Yemeni cause,” he added.

“We are committed to providing all humanitarian support to our brothers there. We are also working on the post-war reconstruction of Yemen.” The Kingdom supports the envoy’s efforts to hold negotiations at the end of November, added Al-Jubeir.

Saudi Arabia is the largest provider of humanitarian aid to Yemen, providing more than $13 billion since the start of the conflict, he said.

In contrast, Houthi militias are imposing restrictions on Yemeni cities and villages, leading to starvation, he added. 

They are also seizing humanitarian aid and preventing Yemenis from getting cholera vaccinations, Al-Jubeir said. 

The Houthis fire ballistic missiles indiscriminately at Saudi Arabia, use children as fighters and plant mines across Yemen, he added. 

The Houthis should engage in the political process and respond to the will of the international community to end the war and end the coup against the legitimate government, he said.

Saudi Arabia did not want the conflict in Yemen; it was imposed on the Kingdom, Al-Jubeir added. 

Saudi Arabia worked with other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) member states to develop the Gulf Initiative. 

This led to a transition from former President Ali Abdullah Saleh to the internationally recognized government headed by current President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi.

The Kingdom also worked to develop Yemeni national dialogue that led to a Yemeni vision regarding the country’s future.

A new Yemeni constitution was about to be drafted when the Houthis seized much of the country, including the capital. 

Yemen’s legitimate government requested support, and the Saudi-led coalition responded under Article 51 of the UN Charter.