UN: Missiles fired at Saudi Arabia have ‘common origin’

Shi'ite Houthi rebel fighters ride a truck in Sanaa, in this file photo. (REUTERS)
Updated 11 December 2017
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UN: Missiles fired at Saudi Arabia have ‘common origin’

NEW YORK: UN officials have found that missiles fired at Saudi Arabia by Yemen’s Houthi militias appear to have a “common origin,” but they are still investigating US and Saudi claims that Iran supplied them, according to a confidential report.
The officials traveled to Saudi Arabia to examine the debris of missiles fired on July 22 and Nov. 4, wrote UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres in the fourth biannual report on the implementation of UN sanctions and restrictions on Iran.
They found “that the missiles had similar structural and manufacturing features which suggest a common origin,” said Guterres in the Friday report to the UN Security Council, seen by Reuters.
The report comes amid calls by the US for Iran to be held accountable for violating UN Security Council resolutions by supplying weapons to the Houthis.
The report said the UN officials saw three components, which Saudi authorities said came from the missile fired on Nov. 4. The components “bore the castings of a logo similar to that of the Shahid Bagheri Industrial Group” — a UN-blacklisted company.
However, the panel said it “as yet has no evidence as to the identity of the broker or supplier” of the missiles, which were likely shipped to the Houthis in violation of a targeted UN arms embargo imposed on Houthi leaders in April 2015.
Yemeni Deputy Premier and Foreign Minister Abdulmalik Al-Mikhlafi said “real opportunities for a peaceful solution” have decreased after the assassination of former President Ali Abdullah Saleh.
According to the Saudi Press Agency, he stressed that the current war had been imposed on the Yemeni people because of the Iran-backed Houthi coup.


Australians rally in support of Muslims after mosques massacre

Updated 22 March 2019
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Australians rally in support of Muslims after mosques massacre

  • Hundreds of Australians on Friday took to the streets in a mass show of support for Muslim communities
  • Crowds from a range of ethnic backgrounds carried banners and chanted slogans backing Muslims

ADELAIDE: Hundreds of Australians on Friday took to the streets in a mass show of support for Muslim communities in the wake of last week’s terror attack on two mosques in New Zealand, which left 50 people dead. 
A huge rally took place in the center of Adelaide, the capital of South Australia, a week to the day since the shootings in Christchurch.
And students at The University of Adelaide staged their own gathering in front of the main campus to express solidarity and denounce racism.
Crowds from a range of ethnic backgrounds carried banners and chanted slogans backing Muslims and other minority groups as they marched in the city’s Rundle Mall. They also criticized the Australian Border Force for its policies toward immigrants.
In cities throughout Australia people, shocked by the attacks on worshippers at the Al-Noor and Linwood mosques, rallied to condemn extremism and racial hate.
New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern described the atrocity as the darkest day in her country’s history.