Palestinian injustice fuels Middle East violence, Jordan’s king says

Jordan’s King Abdullah II attending the Extraordinary Summit of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) on last week’s US recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, in Istanbul. (AFP PHOTO / YOUSEF ALLAN / JORDANIAN ROYAL PALACE)
Updated 14 December 2017
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Palestinian injustice fuels Middle East violence, Jordan’s king says

ANKARA: The Middle East will never be at peace without a resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, King Abdullah of Jordan said on Wednesday.
“The violence witnessed in the Arab world and beyond is the result of the absence of a just solution to the Palestinian cause and the resulting feelings of injustice and frustration,” the king told an emergency summit of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) in Istanbul.
He rejected any attempt to change the historical and legal status of Jerusalem and its holy sites, following last week’s US decision to recognize the city as Israel’s capital and move its embassy there.
The decision was unlawful and could “trigger chaos in the region,” and the world should recognize East Jerusalem as the capital of the state of Palestine, the OIC, the collective voice of the Muslim world, said in a declaration after the meeting.
“We reaffirmed once again the vital importance of preserving the sanctity and historical status of Al-Quds and Haram Al-Sharif for the whole Muslim Ummah, emphasizing that the Muslim Ummah could strongly defend its causes globally only by acting in unity and solidarity,” the declaration signed by 48 countries said.
The OIC expressed its support for Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas and its “attachment to a just and comprehensive peace based on a two-state solution with East Jerusalem as the capital of the state of Palestine.”
Turkey hosted the meeting in its capacity as current chair of the OIC. “It is a requisite for countries that have not yet recognized the Palestinian state to take this essential step, to preserve a balance ensuring justice in the region,” President Recep Tayyip Erdogan told delegates.
“Without bringing a fair and sustainable solution to the Palestinian issue, we cannot talk about enduring peace and stability, either in the region or on a global scale,” he said.
The US mediation role in the peace process was over and the UN had to consider the situation, Erdogan said.
Abbas urged the OIC to take “very clear and strong decisions” to protect Jerusalem’s places of worship for both Muslims and Christians.
The OIC meeting showed once again the value of Muslim countries coming together to protect and dignify important Islamic sites, said Enes Ayasli, research assistant at Sakarya University in Turkey.
Recognizing East Jerusalem as Palestine’s capital would be a counter-move with unknown practical repercussions, but it would provide an effective instrument to gather countries supporting the Palestinian cause, Ayasli told Arab News.


Houthi militia ‘must respect neutrality of aid workers’

Updated 19 January 2019
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Houthi militia ‘must respect neutrality of aid workers’

  • The recommendations came as UN monitors try to strengthen a cease-fire in the port of Hodeidah
  • Houthis were blamed for an attack on a UN convey on Thursday

 NEW YORK: UN experts monitoring sanctions against Yemen are recommending that the Security Council urge the Houthis to respect the neutrality and independence of humanitarian workers.

The Associated Press has obtained the nine recommendations the panel of experts made in their latest report to the council.

The recommendations came as UN monitors try to strengthen a cease-fire in the port of Hodeidah, key to the delivery of 70 percent of Yemen’s imports and humanitarian aid, and arrange a withdrawal of rival forces from the area agreed to by the government and the Houthis on Dec. 13.

While the agreement in Stockholm was limited, if fully implemented it could offer a potential breakthrough in Yemen’s four-year civil war.

The experts asked the Security Council committee monitoring sanctions against Yemen to engage with Secretary-General Antonio Guterres’s office, Yemen’s government and donors to “enhance” the UN mission inspecting vessels heading to ports in Yemen for illegal arms so it can “identify networks using false documentation to evade inspection.”

They also suggested that Guterres organize a conference with the International Monetary Fund and World Bank as well as other “key actors to best manage cash flows and imports of goods,” using the principles of the UN Global Compact on how companies should conduct business.

And the experts recommended that the secretary-general ask the UN inspection mission and monitors at the port of Hodeidah “to share information on potential cases of acts that threaten the peace, stability and security of Yemen,” including violations of international human rights and humanitarian law, the UN arms embargo, and obstructions of humanitarian assistance.

The experts also asked the sanctions committee to consider sending three letters. One would be to Abu Al-Abbas, a militia commander in the flashpoint city of Taiz, asking him to transfer artifacts and items from the Taiz National Museum in his custody to Yemen’s government. 

A second would be to alert the International Maritime Organization to “the risks posed by anti-ship cruise missiles and water-borne improvised explosive devices in the Red Sea and to encourage it to discuss these threats with the commercial shipping industry with the aim of developing suitable precautions and countermeasures.”

The third would be to alert the International Civil Aviation Organization of the risks posed by drones and munitions to civil aviation, particularly near busy international airports on the Arabian Peninsula “and encourage it to discuss these threats with airport operators and airlines with the aim of developing suitable precautions and countermeasures.”