Palestinian injustice fuels Middle East violence, Jordan’s king says

Jordan’s King Abdullah II attending the Extraordinary Summit of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) on last week’s US recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, in Istanbul. (AFP PHOTO / YOUSEF ALLAN / JORDANIAN ROYAL PALACE)
Updated 14 December 2017
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Palestinian injustice fuels Middle East violence, Jordan’s king says

ANKARA: The Middle East will never be at peace without a resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, King Abdullah of Jordan said on Wednesday.
“The violence witnessed in the Arab world and beyond is the result of the absence of a just solution to the Palestinian cause and the resulting feelings of injustice and frustration,” the king told an emergency summit of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) in Istanbul.
He rejected any attempt to change the historical and legal status of Jerusalem and its holy sites, following last week’s US decision to recognize the city as Israel’s capital and move its embassy there.
The decision was unlawful and could “trigger chaos in the region,” and the world should recognize East Jerusalem as the capital of the state of Palestine, the OIC, the collective voice of the Muslim world, said in a declaration after the meeting.
“We reaffirmed once again the vital importance of preserving the sanctity and historical status of Al-Quds and Haram Al-Sharif for the whole Muslim Ummah, emphasizing that the Muslim Ummah could strongly defend its causes globally only by acting in unity and solidarity,” the declaration signed by 48 countries said.
The OIC expressed its support for Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas and its “attachment to a just and comprehensive peace based on a two-state solution with East Jerusalem as the capital of the state of Palestine.”
Turkey hosted the meeting in its capacity as current chair of the OIC. “It is a requisite for countries that have not yet recognized the Palestinian state to take this essential step, to preserve a balance ensuring justice in the region,” President Recep Tayyip Erdogan told delegates.
“Without bringing a fair and sustainable solution to the Palestinian issue, we cannot talk about enduring peace and stability, either in the region or on a global scale,” he said.
The US mediation role in the peace process was over and the UN had to consider the situation, Erdogan said.
Abbas urged the OIC to take “very clear and strong decisions” to protect Jerusalem’s places of worship for both Muslims and Christians.
The OIC meeting showed once again the value of Muslim countries coming together to protect and dignify important Islamic sites, said Enes Ayasli, research assistant at Sakarya University in Turkey.
Recognizing East Jerusalem as Palestine’s capital would be a counter-move with unknown practical repercussions, but it would provide an effective instrument to gather countries supporting the Palestinian cause, Ayasli told Arab News.


UN agency to donors: Back Palestine efforts anew, keep funding at 2018 levels

The UN Relief and Works Agency provides food assistance to 1 million people in Gaza every three months, which is half of the area’s population. (AFP)
Updated 48 min 35 sec ago
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UN agency to donors: Back Palestine efforts anew, keep funding at 2018 levels

  • ‘Exceptional’ contributions enabled the UN Relief and Works Agency to fund its entire 2018 budget of $1.2 billion
  • ‘Countries that supported us last year I would say were extremely proud to contribute to the solution’

UNITED NATIONS: The head of the UN agency that helps 5.3 million Palestinian refugees on Monday urged donors who filled a $446 million hole in its budget last year after the Trump administration drastically cut the US contribution to be equally generous this year.
“Last year we had an extraordinary crisis and an out of the ordinary response,” Pierre Krahenbuhl said in an interview with The Associated Press. “Our humble request to all the donors is: Please keep your funding levels at the same level as 2018.”
He said he has been thanking donors for their “exceptional” contributions that enabled the UN Relief and Works Agency to fund its entire 2018 budget of $1.2 billion.
Krahenbuhl said the agency, known as UNRWA, also adopted a $1.2 billion budget for 2019, and this year it is getting nothing from the United States. Last year, the Trump administration gave $60 million, a dramatic reduction from the $360 million it provided in 2017, when the United States was the agency’s largest donor.
US President Donald Trump said in January 2018 that the Palestinians must return to peace talks to receive US aid money — a comment that raised alarm from leaders of 21 international humanitarian groups, who protested that the administration’s link between aid and political objectives was “dangerous.”
Krahenbuhl said the campaign that UNRWA launched immediately after the US slashed its contribution succeeded as a result of “very important donations,” starting with the European Union, which became the agency’s biggest donor. He said 40 countries and institutions increased funding to UNRWA, including Germany, United Kingdom, Sweden, Japan, Canada and Australia. Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Kuwait each gave $50 million, he said.
“Countries that supported us last year I would say were extremely proud to contribute to the solution,” Krahenbuhl said.
Last year, he said, the number of multi-year funding agreements with donors rose to 19.
So UNRWA right now is in “a somewhat better position” than it was last year, with a shortfall of just over $200 million, Krahenbuhl said.
So far this year, the agency has received $245 million and is expecting $100 million more, he said, which means it should be financially OK until about May.
“But from then on we’ll start to ... reach some crisis points,” Krahenbuhl said.
He said UNRWA is thinking about holding some events in the next two or three months “to collectively mobilize the donor community.” In June, he said, there will be a pledging conference at which the UN and donors will take stock of the agency’s financial situation.
Krahenbuhl said he is committed to making up for the $60 million that UNRWA is losing from the United States this year through internal cost saving measures to reduce the agency’s expenditures.
“That’s going to hurt, but that’s where we feel our financial responsibility, so that we preserve the trust that was generated by the level of donors,” he said, noting that UNRWA last year saved $92 million.
Krahenbuhl said donors recognize the agency does important work. He pointed to the 280,000 boys and girls in UNRWA schools in Gaza and the food assistance the agency provides to 1 million people there every three months. “That’s half of Gaza’s population,” he said.
The UNRWA chief also said that continuing the agency’s services to Palestinian refugees in Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Gaza and elsewhere in the Mideast “is in everybody’s interest” and important for stability in the region.
“If you take Gaza right now ... it’s continuously at the razor’s edge,” Krahenbuhl said, stressing that any shift in humanitarian assistance or conditions that people live in “can trigger the need for justification, or the excuse ... to go back to war.”
Noting his own experience in the 2014 war between Israel and Hamas, which controls Gaza, Krahenbuhl said, “this is absolutely devastating and needs to be avoided.”