Sudan aims to increase gold production in 2018

Gold bars. (Reuters)
Updated 28 December 2017
0

Sudan aims to increase gold production in 2018

KHARTOUM: Sudan is aiming to raise its production of gold to 110 tons in 2018 to become the ninth biggest producer in the world and the second biggest in Africa, according to Asharq Al-Awsat.
China is the world’s largest producer of gold, at 450 tons per year.
The Sudanese Ministry of Minerals, through its supervisory and technical arm (the Sudanese Mineral Resources Company), said in a statement on Wednesday that its production of gold amounted to 103 tons up until December, and that this figure was equal to 107% of this year’s production target.
The company also said that total revenues amounted to SDG1.9 billion ($0.27 million).
Sudan has seen significant activity in the extraction and exploration of gold during the past five years, and more than 450 local and international companies operate in this field.
The Ministry of Minerals plans to regulate the traditional mining market and establish about 40 gold-trading markets. It announced on Wednesday that it plans to set up an international gold stock exchange at the beginning of 2018 to curb smuggling of the precious metal. Sudan exports only one quarter of the gold that it produces while the rest is smuggled.
It is expected that the new stock exchange will help to stop these illegal practices.
Minister of Minerals Hashim Ali Salem said in a press statement that Sudan had only consumed one percent of its reserves of gold and other minerals, which is estimated at 500 tons of gold and 1.5 billion tons of iron, in addition to precious and rare stones.
The minister also revealed a plan to nationalize the production of 18 minerals including salt, mica, white sand and marble.


Oil rises after US Navy destroys Iranian drone

Updated 19 July 2019
0

Oil rises after US Navy destroys Iranian drone

  • The International Energy Agency is revising its 2019 global oil demand growth forecast to 1.1 million barrels per day
  • Speculators have exited options positions that could have provided exposure to higher prices in the next several years

TOKYO: Oil prices rose more than 1 percent on Friday after the US Navy destroyed an Iranian drone in the Strait of Hormuz, a major chokepoint for global crude flows, again raising tensions in the Middle East.
Brent crude futures were up 82 cents, or 1.3 percent, at $62.75 by 0100 GMT. They closed down 2.7 percent on Thursday, falling for a fourth day.
West Texas Intermediate crude futures firmed 61 cents, or 1.1 percent, at 55.91. They fell 2.6 percent in the previous session.
The United States said on Thursday that a US Navy ship had “destroyed” an Iranian drone in the Strait of Hormuz after the aircraft threatened the vessel, but Iran said it had no information about losing a drone.
The move comes after Britain pledged to defend its shipping interests in the region, while US Central Command chief General Kenneth McKenzie said the United States would work “aggressively” to enable free passage after recent attacks on oil tankers in the Gulf.
Still, the longer-term outlook for oil has grown increasingly bearish.
The International Energy Agency (IEA) is reducing its 2019 oil demand forecast due to a slowing global economy amid a US-China trade spat, its executive director said on Thursday.
The IEA is revising its 2019 global oil demand growth forecast to 1.1 million barrels per day (bpd) and may cut it again if the global economy and especially China shows further weakness, Fatih Birol said.
“China is experiencing its slowest economic growth in the last three decades, so are some of the advanced economies ... if the global economy performs even poorer than we assume, then we may even look at our numbers once again in the next months to come,” Birol told Reuters in an interview.
Last year, the IEA predicted that 2019 oil demand would grow by 1.5 million bpd but had already cut the growth forecast to 1.2 million bpd in June this year.
Speculators have exited options positions that could have provided exposure to higher prices in the next several years, market participants said on Thursday.
US offshore oil and gas production has continued to return to service since Hurricane Barry passed through the Gulf of Mexico last week, triggering platform evacuations and output cuts.
Royal Dutch Shell, a top Gulf producer, said Wednesday it had resumed about 80 percent of its average daily production in the region.