Food trucks and camels mingle in national fair

A foreign visitor at the King Abdul Aziz Camel Festival that kicked off on Monday in Riyadh. (AN photo)
Updated 02 January 2018
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Food trucks and camels mingle in national fair

JEDDAH: The Al-Dahnaa Desert buzzes with life and commercial activity as it hosts the King Abdul Aziz Camel Festival, which is expected to attract around 20,000 visitors every day — especially during the holidays — between Jan. 1 and Feb. 1, 2018.
The festival includes a market for productive families, with 100 points of sale for displaying handcrafted products, the most noticeable of which are camel heritage tools and leathers.
There is another market, which includes 100 points of sale for camels, cattle, fodder, antiques, vintage toys, handicrafts, tents, food supplies, laundries, firewood and camping supplies.
Several catering companies and coffee shops will participate in the festival to provide everything campers, participants, guests and tourists may need.
The director of the project, Mohammed Al-Hasoun, said the street allocated for the market was paved this year and developed to better serve shop owners and shoppers.
“The shops’ tents were altered to look the same and have similar colors, sizes, and specifications,” he added.
The official spokesman for the festival, Sultan Al-Bokomi, said a special area was allocated for 25 food trucks to ensure a diverse food menu at a nominal subscription of SR3,000 ($800) throughout the festival, and the festival’s management will provide these trucks with electricity and any service they might need.
Al-Bokomi pointed out that there are rules and regulations governing the trucks’ work at the festival, including having a municipal license for carrying out such activity, and in case there were employees, they should be sponsored by the truck owner and must provide a health certificate.
He also confirmed that the festival’s management would control prices and ensure a safe, healthy and clean environment throughout the event’s activities.
The King Abdul Aziz Camel Festival is open for visitors between 9 a.m. and 10 p.m.


Houthis accused of looting humanitarian aid

A worker unloads aid packages from a Saudi air force cargo plane, at an airfield in the northern province of Marib, Yemen, in this January 22, 2018 photo. (REUTERS)
Updated 23 July 2018
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Houthis accused of looting humanitarian aid

  • The Yemen Scholars Association condemned the Houthi militia for looting relief aid in areas under its control

JEDDAH: The Yemen Scholars Association on Saturday blamed the Iranian-backed Houthi militias for the deterioration of the humanitarian situation in Yemen.
The associated accused the Houthis of looting humanitarian aid.
According to the Yemeni scholars, Houthi actions have resulted in the suspension of salaries of hundreds of thousands of employees for nearly two years.
The Association praised the efforts and humanitarian support of King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief), which provides, directly and indirectly, most of the humanitarian relief support for the Yemeni people.
The Yemen Scholars Association condemned the Houthi militia for looting relief aid in areas under its control.
According to a human rights report, At least 113 people have been tortured to death in detention centers in Yemen run by the Houthis since the coup began
Yemeni Human Rights Minister Mohammed Askar told Arab News that the figures in the report were only estimates and that the real figures were much higher.