Indonesia introduces new Internet censorship system

The Sudirman business district in Jakarta. Indonesia is set to implement a new $14 million Internet censorship.system. (Reuters)
Updated 05 January 2018
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Indonesia introduces new Internet censorship system

JAKARTA: Indonesia’s Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Ministry is set to implement a new $14 million Internet censorship system from Wednesday. The new system will automatically block pornography and other content deemed to be unsuitable by the government, following years of manual monitoring which has failed to adequately police the abundance of illicit online content.
The ministry’s Information Applications Director General Semuel Pangerapan said the machine is equipped with artificial intelligence that will crawl websites and use keywords to detect inappropriate content.
“After the content is crawled, our team will evaluate and verify the data,” Pangerapan told Arab News. “We will then block sites that are validated as carrying negative content. This machine will make our
jobs a lot faster.” The new system will enable the ministry to identify a range of negative content referencing topics from gambling, terrorism, fraud and drugs, to hoaxes and fake news, he added.
The ministry cooperates with related government agencies including the national counterterrorism agency (BNPT) to examine extremist material, and the national anti-narcotics agency (BNN) to detect content related to narcotics.
The new system began its trial run on Dec. 29, and reportedly crawled 1.2 million sites, detecting 120,000 with negative content, over the weekend. Pangerapan said the ministry has set a target of blocking access to at least 10 million out of an estimated 30 million websites with explicit content.
Pangerapan dismissed concerns that the government would use the new system to monitor citizens’ online activity, saying it was not designed for surveillance or for monitoring online conversation.
Jamalul Izza, chairman of the Association of Indonesian Internet Providers (APJII), told Arab News that pornographic websites rank first on the government’s list of negative content, followed by hoax and fake news.
Izza said APJII members have always complied with government requests to block access to certain websites. “This machine will make the system work better and faster,” he explained. A 2016 survey showed there were 132.7 million Internet users in Indonesia, which has a population of 256 million. As many as 129 million users used the Internet to access social media platforms, with Facebook being the most visited (71.6 million users).
Dedy Permadi, director of the Center for Digital Society at Universitas Gadjah Mada in Yogyakarta, said the machine would be a good solution for the government in its attempts to block access to negative content.
In the past, he said, the most “worrying” content found was “pornography and online radicalism.” “The government detected and blocked websites that provided information on how to make bombs,” Permadi explained. He said the less-sophisticated technology that the ministry previously used had only managed to detect 700,000 sites with offensive content over the past few years, so the new system’s performance is a notable step up.


Malaysia says it won’t host any more events involving Israel

Updated 16 January 2019
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Malaysia says it won’t host any more events involving Israel

  • Malaysia is a strong supporter of the Palestinian plight
  • The government said Israeli swimmers cannot join the competition in July that serves as a qualifying event for the 2020 Tokyo Paralympics

PUTRAJAYA, Malaysia: Malaysia’s foreign minister said Wednesday that the government will not budge over a ban on Israeli athletes in a para swimming competition and has decided that the country will not host any events in the future involving Israel.
Malaysia, a strong supporter of the Palestinian cause, is among the predominantly Muslim countries that do not have diplomatic relations with Israel. The government has said Israeli swimmers cannot join the competition in eastern Sarawak state in July, which serves as a qualifying event for the 2020 Tokyo Paralympics.
Foreign Minister Saifuddin Abdullah said the Cabinet affirmed last week that no Israeli delegates can enter Malaysia for sporting or other events in solidarity with the Palestinians.
“The Cabinet has also decided that Malaysia will not host any more events involving Israel or its representatives. This is to me, a decision to reflect the government’s firm stance over the Israeli issue,” Saifuddin said after meeting a coalition of Muslim groups. The groups submitted a memorandum urging the government to stick to the ban and not to repeat mistakes in the past of allowing Israel delegates into the country.
Saifuddin said the Palestinian cause was not just a religious issue but also a human right violation.
“It’s about fighting on behalf of the oppressed,” he said.
Israel’s Paralympic Committee did not immediately reply to an email requesting comment on Malaysia’s move.
Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad has said the International Paralympic Committee can withdraw Malaysia’s right to host the July 29-Aug 4 championship involving athletes from some 70 countries if they wish to do so. The committee has said it was disappointed with Mahathir’s comments but hopes to find a solution to the issue.
This isn’t the first time Malaysia has stopped Israeli athletes from competing in a sports event. In 2015, two Israeli windsurfers had to withdraw from a competition on the resort island of Langkawi after they were refused visas to enter. The following year, Malaysia decided not to host a 2017 conference of the world football governing body FIFA because an Israeli delegation was scheduled to participate.
But earlier this year, the government allowed a high-level Israeli delegation to attend a UN conference in Kuala Lumpur, sparking widespread anger among Muslim groups.
Some 60 percent of Malaysia’s 32 million people are ethnic Malay Muslims. Many have taken to the streets in the past to support the Palestinian cause.