Private museums open in Madinah to promote Islamic heritage

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Old photos of mosques are displayed at a private museum in Madinah. (AN photo)
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Calligraphy at a private museum in Madinah. (AN photo)
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3D model of Mount Uhud
Updated 05 January 2018
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Private museums open in Madinah to promote Islamic heritage

MADINAH: Since the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) began issuing licenses to private museums, several have opened in Madinah.
In Dar Al-Madinah Museum, visitors and researchers can learn about the life of the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him), Islamic civilization and Madinah’s urban culture.
It is “the first and largest specialized museum of the history and cultural heritage of Madinah and the landmarks of the prophet’s life,” Hassan Taher, executive director, told Arab News.
The museum, which has four main halls, publishes specialized periodicals on Madinah’s history and landmarks, and holds seminars and forums in this field.
The hall on the prophet’s life includes a collection of rare paintings and images of Madinah, and unique collections from Islamic history.
Another hall contains an open courtyard where visitors can enjoy nature and Madinah’s ancient architecture.
The museum has “a highly skilled, informed cadre capable of communicating with the public based on documented sources and real scientific references,” Taher said.
The team includes speakers of seven languages, including Arabic, English, Turkish and Urdu, he added.
Visitors include Madinah residents, Umrah and Hajj pilgrims, official delegations, families, university students and schools from outside and inside the city, he said.
The museum is located on King Abdul Aziz Road in Madinah Knowledge Economic City. It is open Saturday to Thursday from 9.00 a.m. to 8.00 p.m. The entry fee is SR25 ($6.70).


King Salman, Crown Prince Mohammed ‘lend new dimension to unification’

Millions of citizens plan to celebrate the Saudi national day on Sunday. (SPA)
Updated 23 September 2018
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King Salman, Crown Prince Mohammed ‘lend new dimension to unification’

  • More than 900,000 fireworks will light up the sky from 58 locations across the Kingdom

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s National Day, celebrated every year on Sept. 23, has come a long way in broadening the concept of unification over the years.
Though the National Day meant unifying disparate sheikhdoms under the nation’s founder, the late King Abdul Aziz, its implications across the political, socioeconomic and cultural spectrum have not been lost on successive rulers.
It was King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman who fine-tuned the definition of unification as an operating philosophy. This is why millions of citizens plan to celebrate the Saudi National Day on the streets on Sunday.
The capital city, along with other Saudi cities, will witness fireworks and the unfurling of the largest national flag. More than 900,000 fireworks will light up the sky from 58 locations across the Kingdom.
Car owners, limousine drivers and young Saudi motorcyclists said that they planned to go for drives, particularly on the fashionable streets of the capital city, to celebrate. Grocery shops, stationery shops and vendors were selling bunting, flags, banners and pictures of national heroes.
“We went around the city to see the lighting and fireworks,” said Saleh Al-Omri, a local pharmacist. “Green and white balloons fill either sides of Riyadh streets,” he said.
In his National Day congratulatory message, Sheikh Abdul Aziz bin Abdullah Al-Sheikh, Grand Mufti of Saudi Arabia, said: “The wise policy of the leaders of this country contributed to peace, security and stability.”
Fakhr Al-Shawaf, chief executive of Al-Bawani Contracting Co., said: “We are celebrating the 88th anniversary of our unification, a day when the late King Abdul Aziz established the Saudi nation.”
Ali Al-Othaim, a member of Riyadh Chamber’s board of directors, said: “The Kingdom is on the path of comprehensive economic and social development under Vision 2030.”
Shafik Namdar, a taxi driver, said that he had bought an SR10 flag for his car and planned to work and also drive with his friends to look at the city and its landmark buildings.
Several young boys, including Arslan, 12, and Mishal, 14, said that they had bought bunting, badges and flags to decorate their houses. They planned to celebrate with a special meal at home with relatives, before going into the city streets for dance and music. Some of them had plans to organize celebrations in public parks.