Saudi Aramco IPO a step closer as decree creates new corporate structure

Saudi Aramco’s initial public offering could be the biggest in history, raising up to $100 billion. (Reuters)
Updated 05 January 2018
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Saudi Aramco IPO a step closer as decree creates new corporate structure

DUBAI: Saudi Arabia has taken a crucial step in its plans to privatize some of Saudi Aramco by changing the legal status of the national oil giant into a joint stock company.

By incorporating Aramco, the government will be able to offer equity in it either on domestic or foreign stock exchanges, or to any outside investor. 

The government has said it plans to sell 5 per cent of Aramco as part of the plan to reduce oil dependency and the role of the public sector under the Vision 2030 strategy.

A decree by the Council of Ministers to implement a change in Aramco’s legal status was published on several official sites. A spokesman for the company confirmed the move. “As a customary step in the preparation process for a Saudi initial public offering (IPO), Aramco has been registered and converted from a royal decree company to a joint stock company.

“This establishes the framework to allow future investors to hold shares in the company alongside its shareholder, the government,” the spokesman added.

According to one scenario for the privatization, Aramco would mount the biggest IPO in history, raising as much as $100 billion on international stock markets. Other possibilities being considered include an IPO on the Tadawul market in Riyadh, potentially alongside a private sale of shares to foreign investors.

The government is committed to an IPO in some form this year, and incorporation as a joint stock company shows that this process is on track. There has been speculation that the sale could be delayed or even canceled altogether.

“This is technical but is a necessary step toward the eventual sale. It means that the government will be in a position to push the button on a share sale, now that shares are in existence in a form that investors can hold,” said one Saudi banking source who did not wish to be identified.

Reuters, citing official Saudi sources, reported that Aramco has a fully paid up capital of SR60 billion ($16 billion), divided into 200 billion shares.

It added that the new board of Aramco will have 11 members, of whom six will be appointed by the government, with big shareholders allowed to propose board members at a general meeting of the company.

The government will retain the right to appoint or dismiss the chairman, currently Khalid Al-Falih, who is also energy minister, and to set oil prices, Reuters said.

Saudi Arabia has been the driving force behind a strategy to push oil prices higher by limiting global output of crude, in partnership with Russia. Yesterday Brent oil was trading at $68.02 per barrel, its highest level since late 2015, after the dramatic fall in value in the summer of 2014.

“There is still a lot to do. Apart from choosing the venue or venues for the IPO, Aramco and its advisers also have to decide the nature of the sale. Saudi citizens will be expecting some form of preferential pricing, and the mechanics of that are quite complicated,” said the Saudi banker. Some experts believe the IPO venue will be announced after a meeting of the company and its advisers later this month.

Several international exchanges have been vying for the lucrative right to stage the Aramco IPO. The New York Stock Exchange, the world’s biggest, is believed to be in contest with the London Stock Exchange, which has proposed some rule changes to accommodate the Saudi company.

Other contenders include Hong Kong, which could be an important venue if, as has been suggested, the Kingdom does a private deal with a big Chinese investor. Others intermittently in the frame for the IPO include Tokyo, Singapore and Toronto.

Once the Aramco IPO is set in train, it will signal the start of a further $200 billion worth of privatizations, with virtually all state-owned assets in the Kingdom for sale, from power generators and transport infrastructure through to hospitals, schools and even football clubs.


Pakistani central bank lifts interest rate as inflation bites

Updated 20 May 2019
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Pakistani central bank lifts interest rate as inflation bites

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan’s central bank raised its key interest rate to 12.25% on Monday, warning that already soaring inflation risked further rises on the back of higher oil prices and reforms required for a bailout from the International Monetary Fund.
The 150 basis points increase follows a preliminary agreement last week with the IMF for a $6 billion loan that is expected to come with tough conditions, including raising more tax revenues and putting up gas and power prices. It was the eighth time the central bank has increased its main policy rate since the start of last year.
With economic growth set to slow to 2.9% this year from 5.2% last year, according to IMF forecasts, the rate rise adds to pressure on Prime Minister Imran Khan, who came to power last year facing a balance of payments crisis that has now forced his government to turn to the IMF.
Higher prices for basic essentials including food and energy has already stirred public anger but the central bank suggested there was little prospect of any immediate improvement.
Noting average headline inflation rose to 7% in the July-April period from 3.8 percent a year earlier, the central bank said recent rises in domestic oil prices and the cost of food suggested that “inflationary pressures are likely to continue for some time.”

 

It said it expected headline inflation to average between 6.5% and 7.5% for the financial year to the end of June and was expected to be “considerably higher” in the coming year. Expected tax measures in next month’s budget as well as higher gas and power prices and volatility in international oil prices could push inflation up further, it said.
It said the fiscal deficit, which the IMF expects to reach 7.2% of gross domestic product (GDP) this year, was likely to have been “considerably higher” during the July-March period than in the same period a year earlier due to shortfalls in revenue collection, higher interest payments and security costs.
Despite some improvements, financing the current account deficit remained “challenging” and foreign exchange reserves of $8.8 billion were below standard adequacy levels at less than the equivalent of three months of imports.
The central bank said it was watching foreign exchange markets closely and was prepared to take action to curb “unwarranted” volatility, after the sharp fall in the rupee over recent days that saw the currency touch a record low of 150 against the US dollar.
Details of what Pakistan will be required to do under the IMF agreement, which must still be approved by the Fund’s board, have not been announced but already opposition parties are planning protests.
As well as higher energy prices that will hit households hard, there are also expectations of new taxes and spending cuts in next month’s budget to reach a primary budget deficit — excluding interest payments — of 0.6% of GDP.
With the IMF forecasting a primary deficit of 2.2% for the coming financial year, that implies squeezing roughly $5 billion in extra revenues from Pakistan’s $315 billion economy, which has long suffered from problems raising tax revenue.

FACTOID

Pakistan’s economic growth is set to slow to 2.9% this year.