Sudanese students stone police on third day of bread price protests

Street protests broke out across the African country after bread prices doubled. (AFP)
Updated 09 January 2018
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Sudanese students stone police on third day of bread price protests

KHARTOUM: Hundreds of Sudanese students on Monday threw rocks at riot police and were met with tear gas salvos on the third consecutive days of protests over a doubling in bread prices, witnesses said.
They said police formed a cordon to force more than 300 marchers onto the campus of Khartoum University, the largest in Sudan, and continued to fire tear gas at students chanting, “No, no, no to price rises!”
A smaller number of protesters gathered in Kosti, Sudan’s biggest Nile river port 350 km (217 miles) south of the capital, but were dispersed by baton-wielding police.
Street protests broke out across the sprawling northeastern African country after bread prices doubled following a government announcement late last month that it was eliminating subsidies in its 2018 budget.
A high school student was killed and six others wounded on Sunday in the southwestern city of Geneina. Authorities did not give a cause of death but said investigations were under way.
This month Sudan devalued its pound currency to 18 per US dollar from 6.7 pounds to the dollar previously.
Amid the continuing unrest, the exchange rate on the black market hit about 29.5 pounds to the dollar on Monday, compared with 28 pounds to the dollar a day before.
State Minister of Interior Babkar Daqna denied that the demonstrations were in response to price rises and said that destructive protesters would be “dealt with forcefully,” state news agency SUNA reported on Sunday.


Iran’s Khameni advises parliament to pass own anti-money laundering law

Updated 25 min 41 sec ago
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Iran’s Khameni advises parliament to pass own anti-money laundering law

BEIRUT: Iran’s Supreme Leader advised members of parliament on Wednesday to pass their own legislation to combat money laundering, decreasing chances that laws based on requirements by the global Financial Action Task Force (FATF) will be passed.
“Some of these treaties have useful parts, it’s not a problem,” Aytollah Ali Khamenei said in a speech to members of parliament, according to a transcript published on his official website. “The solution for this issue is that the parliament should make up its own law. For example, a law for fighting money laundering. There is no need for us to accept things that we don’t know where they will end up.”
Iran has been attempting to implement standards set by FATF, a global group of government anti-money-laundering agencies, in the hopes it will be removed from a blacklist that makes some foreign investors reluctant to deal with the country.