Yemen ports open for aid, Houthis using ‘advanced weaponry’: Coalition spokesman

Coalition forces spokesman Col. Turki Al-Maliki, pictured here in a file photo, said several ports in Yemen had reopened for aid shipments. (AN Photo)
Updated 10 January 2018
0

Yemen ports open for aid, Houthis using ‘advanced weaponry’: Coalition spokesman

RIYADH: The Houthi militia in Yemen targeted a Saudi jet on Sunday using “advanced weaponry,” coalition forces spokesman Col. Turki Al-Maliki said on Wednesday.
The Iran-backed militias are also using radars and other high-tech equipment to locate ships, Al-Maliki said.
Investigations are underway to establish where the equipment is coming from, he said, adding that the Houthis’ have raised at least $1 billion through collection of taxes.
A Saudi oil tanker was targeted Saturday by Houthi speed boats, the spokesman told a press conference in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Both commercial and aid vessels are being targeted by the militias, he said.
A total of 87 ballistic missiles have been targeted at Saudi Arabia by Houthi militias to date, he added.
The Saudi spokesperson elaborated that the last ballistic missile, which was intercepted over Najran in Saudi Arabia on Jan. 5, caused collateral damage, while some Houthi weapons in storage have been targeted by the coalition and destroyed.
Several ports in Yemen had been closed amid accusations that Iran is providing weapons to Houthi militia in the ongoing conflict.
Al-Maliki said however that land, sea and airports have now been reopened for international aid. These include the ports of Hodeidah, Aden, Mukala and Al-Mokha, with at least four aid ships already having been granted access.
Houthi forces are now focusing their attacks on Hodeidah, Al-Maliki said, adding that it was “vital” that the area is retaken to allow further humanitarian aid through the port. The coalition forces are advancing in Hodeidah and Jouf governorate in Yemen, Al-Maliki said.
Al-Maliki spoke of the Houthis' commitment to war and not peace. During the press conference a photo was shown portraying a soldier reading a primitive notebook that had pictures with instructions for the use of missiles. “Evidence proves that Houthis are being supported by foreign experts,” Al-Maliki said.
Al-Maliki pointed out that the Houthis are disguising themselves as normal citizens in order to avoid being targeted and taken in. He made clear that the coalition forces are advanced and monitoring them day and night. To fund their ongoing war in Yemen, Al-Maliki confirmed that “some Yemeni economic ventures and sectors are being forced to pay the Houthis.”
Finding a peaceful political solution is the best way forward, but the Houthis are not committed to this, Al-Maliki added.


FaceOf: Rayed Al-Ajaji, CEO of KSA's Universal Metal Coating Company

Rayed Al-Ajaji
Updated 17 November 2018
0

FaceOf: Rayed Al-Ajaji, CEO of KSA's Universal Metal Coating Company

  • Al-Ajaji professional experience spans more than 20 years and includes the markets of Saudi Arabia, the GCC, and other Arab countries
  • Al-Ajaji earned a bachelor’s degree in engineering management and a master’s degree in industrial management from the University of Miami between 1992 and 1997. 

Rayed Al-Ajaji is the CEO of the Universal Metal Coating Company Ltd. (UNICOIL) and chairman for the National Committee for Steel Industry (NCSI). He recently spoke at the 13th annual Arab Steel Summit in Amman about how the government and the private sector can work together to ensure future market competitiveness. 

“Despite the fact that so many of our manufacturers are producing at less than 50 percent capacity due to unfair competition, as a country we are a net importer of steel,” he said. “We are leaving billions of economic value on the table.

“We have an opportunity today to work together to stop that and keep this revenue in the country to help achieve our ambitious national growth plans. Our country has invested billions over the years in world-class facilities that manufacture the highest-quality steel products and we must work together to ensure it remains competitive and thriving.”

Al-Ajaji earned a bachelor’s degree in engineering management and a master’s degree in industrial management from the University of Miami between 1992 and 1997. 

He subsequently gained a diverse range of experience in various steel-manufacturing processes, including the commercial steel trade, building materials, and business process re-engineering. 

His professional experience spans more than 20 years and includes the markets of Saudi Arabia, the GCC, and other Arab countries.

NCSI is a not-for-profit organization set up by the Council of Saudi Chambers with a mandate to meet challenges, engage with industry members, and develop a culture of industrial and communal responsibility and commitment toward the realization of Saudi Vision 2030.