Turkey starts lifting stricken Pegasus plane from cliff

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People work on a recovery operation around a Boeing 737-800 of Turkey's Pegasus Airlines in Trabzon, Turkey. (AP)
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People work on a recovery operation around a Boeing 737-800 of Turkey's Pegasus Airlines in Trabzon, Turkey. (AP)
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People work on a recovery operation around a Boeing 737-800 of Turkey's Pegasus Airlines in Trabzon, Turkey. (AP)
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People work on a recovery operation around a Boeing 737-800 of Turkey's Pegasus Airlines in Trabzon, Turkey. (AP)
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People work on a recovery operation around a Boeing 737-800 of Turkey's Pegasus Airlines in Trabzon, Turkey. (AP)
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People work on a recovery operation around a Boeing 737-800 of Turkey's Pegasus Airlines in Trabzon, Turkey. (AP)
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People work on a recovery operation around a Boeing 737-800 of Turkey's Pegasus Airlines in Trabzon, Turkey. (AP)
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People work on a recovery operation around a Boeing 737-800 of Turkey's Pegasus Airlines in Trabzon, Turkey. (AP)
Updated 19 January 2018
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Turkey starts lifting stricken Pegasus plane from cliff

ISTANBUL: Turkish engineers on Thursday began a complex operation to lift with two cranes a passenger plane which skidded off the runway at a provincial airport to a precarious position just meters from the sea.
The Pegasus Airlines Boeing 737-800 plane had landed normally at Trabzon airport late on Saturday on a flight from Ankara but then went off the runway just meters (feet) from the waters of the Black Sea with its wheels stuck in mud.
Since then, it has remained on the steep slope that descends from the airport apron into the sea for four days, its nose pointing down and managing to defy gravity by being stuck in thick mud.

The Turkish aviation authorities closed Trabzon airport from 0100 GMT to all air traffic so that the salvage operation can take place, with flights diverted to the nearby Ordu-Giresun airport, also on the Black Sea.
The authorities sent two cranes from Ankara and Samsun to carry out the operation, the Dogan news agency said.
Engineers began the operation by tying cables around the wing area of the plane in cradle fashion and also around the tail area. Both cranes will then work to lift the plane onto the runway.

Once it is back on the runway, it will be emptied of remaining fuel, taken to a hangar, where the baggage and personal possessions of the passengers will finally be removed.
All 162 passenger and six crew were safely evacuated but witnesses said at the time it was miracle there had been no casualties and the plane did not slip into the sea.

The pilot told prosecutors investigating the incident that the plane had undergone a sudden surge of power from one of the engines while taxiing on the runway.
The cause of the technical issue has yet to be made clear although images showed one of the engines had broken off and fallen into the sea.


Iranian crude exports fall further as Trump’s sanctions loom

Updated 56 sec ago
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Iranian crude exports fall further as Trump’s sanctions loom

  • The Islamic Republic has exported 1.33 million barrels per day so far in October to India, China, Turkey and the Middle East
  • Iran may not yet have cut production to match the rate of decline in its exports, as the country appears to be storing more oil on ships

LONDON: Turkey and Italy are the last buyers of Iranian crude outside China, India and the Middle East, according to tanker data and an industry source, the latest sign that shipments are taking a major hit from looming US sanctions.
The Islamic Republic has exported 1.33 million barrels per day so far in October to India, China, Turkey and the Middle East, according to Refinitiv Eikon data. No vessels are shown heading to Europe with Iranian crude.
However, an industry source who also tracks the exports estimated shipments at 1.5 million bpd, including vessels which are not showing on AIS satellite tracking, of which a 1 million-barrel tanker is going to Italy.
That’s down from at least 2.5 million bpd in April, before President Donald Trump in May withdrew the United States from a 2015 nuclear deal with Iran and reimposed sanctions. The figures also mark a further fall from 1.6 million bpd in September.
The expected loss of a sizeable amount of Iranian supply has helped drive a rally in oil prices, which on Oct. 3 hit their highest since late 2014 at $86.74 a barrel. Crude has since eased to $81 although analysts say the Iranian export drop remains supportive.
“It’s one of the reasons why prices are still above $80,” said Eugen Weinberg, analyst at Commerzbank.
The October figures add to signs that buyers are sufficiently wary of the US sanctions to stop or scale back their Iranian crude dealings, and that exports are falling more steeply than some in the market expected.
For sure, definitive export data is hard to uncover. Tanker schedules are often adjusted, exports vary week by week and the tracking of tankers, while easier than in the past due to satellite information, remains both art and science.
In the first week of October, Iran’s crude exports averaged 1.1 million bpd according to Refinitiv and less than 1 million bpd according to another industry source.
While Washington has said it wants to cut Iran’s oil exports to zero, Iran and Saudi Arabia say that is unlikely to happen. The Trump administration is considering waivers on sanctions for countries that are reducing their imports.
India, a major buyer, has ordered Iranian oil for November.
Iran, which has pledged to block any OPEC supply increase that the country deems to be against its interests, says it has found new buyers for its oil and its crude output has fallen only slightly.
For September, Iran told OPEC its crude output dropped by 50,000 bpd to 3.76 million bpd, while consultants and government agencies that OPEC uses to monitor production reported a larger fall to 3.45 million bpd.
Indeed, Iran may not yet have cut production to match the rate of decline in its exports, as the country appears to be storing more oil on ships, as it did during sanctions that applied until the 2015 nuclear deal.