Turkey starts lifting stricken Pegasus plane from cliff

1 / 8
People work on a recovery operation around a Boeing 737-800 of Turkey's Pegasus Airlines in Trabzon, Turkey. (AP)
2 / 8
People work on a recovery operation around a Boeing 737-800 of Turkey's Pegasus Airlines in Trabzon, Turkey. (AP)
3 / 8
People work on a recovery operation around a Boeing 737-800 of Turkey's Pegasus Airlines in Trabzon, Turkey. (AP)
4 / 8
People work on a recovery operation around a Boeing 737-800 of Turkey's Pegasus Airlines in Trabzon, Turkey. (AP)
5 / 8
People work on a recovery operation around a Boeing 737-800 of Turkey's Pegasus Airlines in Trabzon, Turkey. (AP)
6 / 8
People work on a recovery operation around a Boeing 737-800 of Turkey's Pegasus Airlines in Trabzon, Turkey. (AP)
7 / 8
People work on a recovery operation around a Boeing 737-800 of Turkey's Pegasus Airlines in Trabzon, Turkey. (AP)
8 / 8
People work on a recovery operation around a Boeing 737-800 of Turkey's Pegasus Airlines in Trabzon, Turkey. (AP)
Updated 19 January 2018
0

Turkey starts lifting stricken Pegasus plane from cliff

ISTANBUL: Turkish engineers on Thursday began a complex operation to lift with two cranes a passenger plane which skidded off the runway at a provincial airport to a precarious position just meters from the sea.
The Pegasus Airlines Boeing 737-800 plane had landed normally at Trabzon airport late on Saturday on a flight from Ankara but then went off the runway just meters (feet) from the waters of the Black Sea with its wheels stuck in mud.
Since then, it has remained on the steep slope that descends from the airport apron into the sea for four days, its nose pointing down and managing to defy gravity by being stuck in thick mud.

The Turkish aviation authorities closed Trabzon airport from 0100 GMT to all air traffic so that the salvage operation can take place, with flights diverted to the nearby Ordu-Giresun airport, also on the Black Sea.
The authorities sent two cranes from Ankara and Samsun to carry out the operation, the Dogan news agency said.
Engineers began the operation by tying cables around the wing area of the plane in cradle fashion and also around the tail area. Both cranes will then work to lift the plane onto the runway.

Once it is back on the runway, it will be emptied of remaining fuel, taken to a hangar, where the baggage and personal possessions of the passengers will finally be removed.
All 162 passenger and six crew were safely evacuated but witnesses said at the time it was miracle there had been no casualties and the plane did not slip into the sea.

The pilot told prosecutors investigating the incident that the plane had undergone a sudden surge of power from one of the engines while taxiing on the runway.
The cause of the technical issue has yet to be made clear although images showed one of the engines had broken off and fallen into the sea.


Jordan’s PM appeals for more aid as most Syrian refugees set to stay

Updated 20 February 2019
0

Jordan’s PM appeals for more aid as most Syrian refugees set to stay

  • Jordan PM says most refugees not returning yet
  • Amman says funding crucial to keep economy afloat

AMMAN: Jordan’s Prime Minister Omar Al-Razzaz appealed on Wednesday to major donors to continue multi-billion dollar funding for Syrian refugees in the kingdom, saying most of those who had fled the eight-year conflict had no intention of returning any time soon.
Razzaz told representatives of major Western donors, UN agencies and NGOs that relatively few refugees had gone back since Syrian President Bashar al Assad’s army last summer regained control of southern Syria, where most had fled from.
“The number of refugees that so far returned voluntarily is low and most have no intention of going back any time soon,” Razzaz told a meeting to launch a UN-funded government plan that earmarks $2.4 billion in funding needs for 2019.
Officials say only around 10,000 refugees out of a total estimated at 1.3 million had left since the two countries opened the vital Nassib-Jaber border crossing last October.
Razzaz echoed the UN view that unstable conditions inside Syria, where large-scale destruction, fear of retribution and military conscription has made many reluctant to return.
“We are now entering a new phase of the Syrian crisis, however the impact is still ongoing. The conditions for their return are not present,” Razzaz added.
The prime minister warned against donor fatigue in a protracted crisis where the needs of refugees and vulnerable Jordanians were largely unchanged.
Maintaining funding that covers education, health and crucial services for tens of thousands of Syrian refugees and local communities was crucial to ease rising pressures on the debt-burdened economy, he added.
“Aid helped Jordan in staying resilient in a difficult regional setting,” Razzaz said, adding the refugee burden had strained meagre resources such as water and electricity, with a donor shortfall covered from state finances.
Jordan is struggling to rein in record public debt of $40 billion, equivalent to 95 percent of gross domestic product, under a tough International Monetary Fund (IMF) austerity plan.
Major donors say more than $6 billion had been extended to Jordan since 2015, which economists credit for rejuvenating once sleepy northern border towns, while refugee entrepreneurship brought a pool of cheap labor and new skills, triggering a property boom and higher productivity.
The kingdom received around $1.6 billion last year alone.
“The level of funding to Jordan that still remains is exceptional in global comparison,” said UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator Anders Pedersen, adding needs had evolved from the humanitarian aid required early in the conflict to development projects that benefit the economy.