Yemen PM thanks Kingdom for saving economy

The Yemeni government announced its budget for 2018 after a three-year hiatus following the Houthi terrorist coup and the takeover of the capital Sanaa in September 2014. (Supplied)
Updated 21 January 2018
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Yemen PM thanks Kingdom for saving economy

ADEN: Yemen Prime Minister Ahmed Obaid bin Daghr thanked the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia for saving the Yemeni economy from collapsing.
It followed a directive issued by King Salman to deposit $2 billion with the Central Bank of Yemen.
Ahmed Obaid bin Daghr said in his announcement of the government’s budget for the fiscal year 2018, that the Kingdom’s deposit saved the Yemeni economy from a complete collapse and restored the balance of the currency, Saudi state-run news agency SPA reported.
He added that the budget approved the salaries for military employees and civil servants of 12 provinces for the whole year. 
The Yemeni government announced its budget for 2018 after a three-year hiatus following the Houthi terrorist coup and the takeover of the capital Sanaa in September 2014.
Ahmed Obaid bin Daghr told a news conference in the interim capital of Aden on Sunday that the new budget was worth 987.2 billion riyals, and expenses were estimated at 1.465 trillion riyals and a financial deficit of 33 percent.
“The budget, by all standards, remains an austerity budget governed by the conditions of the coup against legitimacy,” Bin Daghr said.
He added that the Yemeni House of Representatives, would hold a meeting next month to approve the budget.


Court doubles sentence of Israeli policeman who killed Palestinian

Updated 19 August 2018
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Court doubles sentence of Israeli policeman who killed Palestinian

JERUSALEM: Israel’s top court on Sunday doubled the prison sentence of a police officer who shot dead a Palestinian teenager in 2014, an incident documented by video footage.
The supreme court ruling said the original nine-month prison term handed to Ben Deri by the Jerusalem district court earlier this year did not sufficiently reflect the severity of his actions.
Deri had admitted to fatally shooting Nadeem Nuwarah, 17, on May 15, 2014 during a day of clashes in Beitunia, south of Ramallah in the occupied West Bank, between Israeli forces and Palestinian protesters.
The clashes were on the anniversary of what Palestinians call the Nakba, or “catastrophe,” when more than 700,000 fled or were expelled during the war surrounding Israel’s creation.
Footage recorded by US broadcaster CNN captured a group of five or six border police officers in the area, one of whom could be seen firing at the time when the youth was hit.
Some five minutes earlier, Nuwarah was seen on other CNN footage throwing stones at Israeli forces.
But when Deri shot him, he was not engaged in any such action, simply walking in the general direction of Deri’s force with his hands to his sides, the Sunday decision noted.
Deri had said during his trial he had mistakenly introduced live ammunition into his M-16 instead of rubber bullets.
But even the firing of rubber bullets was not justified at that point, the court said.
The April district court sentencing had “not sufficiently given expression to the value of the human life severed by Deri,” Sunday’s ruling read.
“The prison term sentenced by the district court is not close in expressing the severity of such an intentional deed, combined with the severe negligence that caused the deceased’s death,” supreme court justice Noam Solberg wrote in his decision, supported by another judge and opposed by one.
Right-wing legal aid organization Honenu, which represented Deri, said the supreme court’s ruling could “jeopardize the motivation and operational abilities of our soldiers.”
Defense Minister Avigdor Lieberman said that while Deri’s actions might have been wrong, “that doesn’t mean his punishment should be increased.”