Davos: Trump calls on world to confront Iran’s ‘support for terrorists’

Updated 26 January 2018
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Davos: Trump calls on world to confront Iran’s ‘support for terrorists’

DAVOS: President Donald Trump on Friday called on world powers to do more to confront the threat posed by Iran due to its alleged support for terror groups.
He was addressing the World Economic Forum in Davos, a gathering of generally pro-free-trade political and business leaders.
“We continue to call on partners to confront Iran’s support for terrorists and block Iran’s path to a nuclear weapon,” Trump told the forum.
Trump also called for “maximum pressure” to de-nuke the Korean Peninsula. 
The US president, in his debut appearance at the forum, said that the US was open for business, clarifying one of his campaign mantras. 
"America First does not mean America alone," he said. "The world is experiencing the resurgence of a strong and prosperous America. America is open for business and we are competitive once again."
Trump said that the United States was more attractive than ever to foreign investment under his year-old presidency.
But he warned: "We cannot have free and open trade if some countries exploit the system at the expense of others.
"We support free trade but it needs to be fair and it needs to be reciprocal. The United States will no longer turn a blind eye to unfair economic practices."

WATCH DONALD TRUMP ADDRESSING THE WORLD ECONOMIC FORUM
 


UK PM Theresa May to ask lawmakers to vote on a second Brexit referendum

Updated 28 min 42 sec ago
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UK PM Theresa May to ask lawmakers to vote on a second Brexit referendum

  • May is offering concessions in what she says is a “last chance” to secure British departure
  • May said she was 'making a new offer to find common ground in Parliament'

LONDON: British Prime Minister Theresa May said her government will include in her Withdrawal Agreement Bill a requirement for lawmakers to vote on whether to hold another Brexit referendum.

“I recognise the genuine and sincere strength of feeling across the House on this important issue,” May said. "The government will therefore include in the Withdrawal Agreement Bill at introduction a requirement to vote on whether to hold a second referendum."

“So to those MPs who want a second referendum to confirm the deal - you need a deal and therefore Withdrawal Agreement Bill to make it happen,” May said.

May is offering concessions in what she says is a “last chance” to secure an orderly British departure from the bloc.

The deal that she struck with the EU has been rejected by UK lawmakers three times already.

Since then, she has tried to secure backing from lawmakers with promises to maintain high standards on workers' rights and environmental protections — issues that are priorities for the left-of-center opposition Labour Party.

She also said UK lawmakers would get to decide how close a trade relationship to seek with the EU after Brexit, in a concession to Labour's demands for a customs union.

May said she was “making a new offer to find common ground in Parliament.”

“I have compromised. Now I ask you to compromise too,” she said.

May has said that after Parliament votes on the bill she will set out a timetable for her departure as Conservative leader and prime minister. Pro-Brexit Conservatives blame May for the country's political deadlock and want to replace her with a staunch Brexit supporter such as Boris Johnson, a former foreign secretary.

(With agencies)