Cut off by Israeli wall, Palestinian family declares ‘republic’

Above, members of the Palestinian Jumaa family, whose house became encircled by Israel’s controversial separation barrier, north of Ramallah. The family says they partially cut off from the outside world, sometimes having to cross through an Israeli checkpoint just to buy milk and bread. (AFP)
Updated 31 January 2018
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Cut off by Israeli wall, Palestinian family declares ‘republic’

RAMALLAH, Palestinian Territories: The logic of an Israeli wall north of Ramallah in the occupied West Bank appears clear — on one side Palestinians, on the other the Israeli settlement of Beit El.
But look carefully and you will see a small gap in part of it leading into a courtyard where the Palestinian Jumaa family live.
The newly-built part of the wall which stretches along the road next to the settlement has left the 25 members of the extended family on the opposite side to the rest of the Palestinian town of El-Bireh.
They are, they say, partially cut off from the outside world, sometimes having to cross through an Israeli checkpoint just to buy milk and bread.
“The wall separated us from the people and from Palestinians. I feel I am inside the settlement, even though I am Palestinian,” said Hossam Jumaa, 54 and a father of eight.
“Now we live alone.”
At the house, the children of the three families play in the shadow of the six-meter wall, while their vegetable plots run toward the barrier.
The family said they were informed three years ago by Israeli authorities that they would extend the wall along the road, leaving them on the other side.
But they say construction increased after US President Donald Trump’s December 6 recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, which led to widespread protests and the Palestinian government freezing ties with the US administration.
The Palestinians see east Jerusalem as the capital of their future state, which they say is being rapidly eroded by Israeli settlement growth throughout the West Bank.
“The work used to be at night, but after the protests broke out in the Palestinian territories following the American decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, the work was done in the day,” Hossam’s brother Hakim, 50, said.
The Israeli defense ministry said in a statement the wall was necessary “following a significant number of gunfire incidents from vehicles toward the Beit El community.”
“The barrier does not harm any private land, does not block access to houses and does not change anything on the ground,” it said.
“There is no harm to Palestinians or their land.”
The wall cutting off the Jumaa family is different from Israel’s controversial separation barrier sealing off the West Bank from Israel.
Israel began building the barrier in 2002 during the bloody second Palestinian intifada, or uprising, arguing it was necessary to stop Palestinian attackers.
According to the United Nations, around 65 percent of the separation barrier has so far been constructed, with more than 80 percent inside the West Bank.
The UN says it “impedes access to services and resources, disrupts family and social life (and) undermines livelihoods.”
The wall affecting the Jumaas ranks among the barriers, fences and private security protecting West Bank settlements.
More than 400,000 Israelis live in settlements in the West Bank.
The UN says their existence and growth on land supposed to form a future Palestinian state is one of the largest obstacles to peace.
Palestinians are banned from entering settlements except in exceptional circumstances, and there are near-constant tensions between them.
Settlers have been the regular target of violent attacks by Palestinians. Hardline settlers on the other hand have attacked Palestinians.
The Jumaa family said they have asked for support from Palestinian politicians to oppose the wall but have had little help.
Hossam said being on the opposite side of the wall brings new fears.
In the early 1990s, he said, they were subject to an attack by settlers in which their windows were smashed.
“Now, after we became inside the wall, we are scared of attacks by settlers at any moment.”
A nearby street is also used by the army, with the family worried of bumping into them late at night.
They say their children can no longer go to school or the shops alone without fear.
“We don’t see anyone any more,” seven-year-old Miriam said.
The family have increasingly little hope, instead taking to dark humor.
“Today we are independent. We will call ourselves the Great Republic of Jumaa,” Hakim joked.


New envoy stresses need for UN-backed solution to Syria war

Updated 59 min 10 sec ago
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New envoy stresses need for UN-backed solution to Syria war

  • Pedersen is the fourth UN envoy to seek a solution to Syria's conflict
  • Syria's war has killed more than 360,000 people and displaced millions since the war started with the repression of anti-government protests in 2011

DAMASCUS: The new UN envoy to Syria ended his first visit to the war-torn country Thursday, stressing the need for a UN-brokered political solution to the eight-year conflict.
Geir Pedersen, a seasoned Norwegian diplomat, concluded his three-day visit and headed to the Lebanese capital Beirut, a UN source told AFP.
The new envoy on Twitter late Wednesday said he had a "constructive meeting" with Syrian Foreign Minister Walid Muallem during his stay in Damascus.
During it, he stressed the need for a "Syrian-led and -owned political solution facilitated by the UN", he added.
Pedersen, who started his new job last week, is the fourth UN envoy to seek a solution to Syria's conflict, after endless rounds of failed UN-brokered peace talks.
In recent years, UN-led efforts have been overshadowed by separate negotiations led by regime allies Russia and Iran, as well as rebel backer Turkey.
After Damascus, Pederson said he was off to meet the Syrian Negotiations Committee, Syria's main opposition group.
But he "agreed to come back to Damascus on a regular basis to discuss commonalities and progress on points of disagreement", he added.
On Tuesday, Muallem expressed Syria's "readiness to cooperate with him... in his mission to facilitate Syrian-Syrian dialogue with the objective of reaching a political solution to the Syrian crisis", a foreign ministry statement said.
Pederson takes over from Staffan de Mistura, a Swiss-Italian diplomat who stepped down at the end of last year over "personal reasons".
Officials in the government of President Bashar al-Assad had set the tone for the new envoy's tenure shortly after his appointment was announced in October.
"Syria will cooperate with the new UN envoy Geir Pedersen provided he avoids the methods of his predecessor," Deputy Foreign Minister Faisal al-Meqdad said.
De Mistura ended his four-year tenure with an abortive push to form a committee tasked with drawing up a post-war constitution.
Syria's war has killed more than 360,000 people and displaced millions since the war started with the repression of anti-government protests in 2011.
With key military backing from Russia, Assad's forces have retaken large parts of Syria from rebels and extremists, and now control almost two-thirds of the country.
A drive to bring the Syrian regime back into the Arab fold also seems underway, with the UAE reopening their embassy in Damascus last month.