Hijab-wearing ballerina performs on Alexandria streets to promote tourism

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Ballerina Aya Magdy - a student at Alexandria University - performing dance moves around the Egyptian city to promote tourism. (Photo: Hussein Hossam / Fantasia Photography)
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Ballerina Aya Magdy - a student at Alexandria University - performing dance moves around the Egyptian city to promote tourism. (Photo: Hussein Hossam / Fantasia Photography)
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Ballerina Aya Magdy - a student at Alexandria University - performing dance moves around the Egyptian city to promote tourism. (Photo: Hussein Hossam / Fantasia Photography)
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Ballerina Aya Magdy - a student at Alexandria University - performing dance moves around the Egyptian city to promote tourism. (Photo: Hussein Hossam / Fantasia Photography)
Updated 04 February 2018
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Hijab-wearing ballerina performs on Alexandria streets to promote tourism

ALEXANDRIA: Pictures featuring a 20-year-old Egyptian ballerina wearing a hijab as she performs on the streets of Alexandria have proved popular on social media.
Aya Magdy appears in photographs performing dance moves around the city and on its iconic Stanley Bridge while wearing a headscarf and donning a long-sleeved ballet dress.
Magdy, a law student at Alexandria University, says her aim is to showcase the beauty of her city by performing in front of its most famous sites and encourage tourists to visit.
When asked how people in the street react when seeing her, Magdy said: “They were surprised at first, but soon I began to see admiration in the way they looked at me as they see me perform this beautiful art,” she told the local Youm7 newspaper.
When the photos were posted on a public Facebook page, some people criticized her for dancing and wearing a hijab at the same time.
But Magdy said she wanted to break taboos about ballet dancing in Egypt, and promote it as a form of art.
The idea of taking to Egyptian streets and performing ballet began when the “Ballerinas of Cairo” were spotted posing and performing moves in front of Cairo’s architectural gems.
Magdy says she was inspired by them and wanted to do the same for her city.
See more photos from the shoot by Hussein Hossam / Fantasia Photography here.


Rare Ottoman dish to go on sale at Sotheby’s London

A rare piece of Iznik pottery is going on sale at Sotheby’s in London on Wednesday. (Shutterstock)
Updated 9 min 24 sec ago
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Rare Ottoman dish to go on sale at Sotheby’s London

LONDON: An exceptionally rare, museum-quality piece of Iznik pottery is to go on sale at Sotheby’s in London on Wednesday.

The Debbane Charger (circa 1480) is set to go on sale. Sotheby’s London

The Debbane Charger, or dish (circa 1480), one of the most important pieces of Iznik pottery held in private hands, represents a significant discovery in the field of Ottoman art.
Produced during the reign of Mehmet II, the piece belongs to the earliest group of Iznik, characterized by an intense, inky, blue-black coloring which reflects the embryonic stage of firing control two decades before a brighter cobalt blue was achieved.
The charger is a lost “sibling” to four other large dishes, all of which are held in museums, including the Louvre in Paris. They are described in Nurhan Atasoy and Julian Raby’s book “Iznik: The Pottery of Ottoman Turkey,” where it was suggested they were used in court banquets. Though not identical, they display a number of shared elements — the huge scale, central floret, and use of both Rumi and Hatayi motifs, the names given to the rigorously executed arabesque decoration and Chinoiserie floral scrolls respectively.
The charger was formerly in the collection of bibliophile and businessman Max Debbane, who patronized many leading cultural institutions in the town of his birth, Alexandria in Egypt, as well as serving as president of the Archaeological Society.
Opportunities to acquire works of Iznik pottery from this earliest period are very rare, with the most significant examples dating back to Sotheby’s sales in 1993 and 1997.
Further highlights of the Wednesday’s sale include Indian paintings from the estate of Joe and Helen Darrion and a costume album that presents a comprehensive catalogue of the costumes of Ottoman Turkey in the 19th century.

The sale also includes Indian artworks. Sotheby’s London