Saudi Labor Ministry calls on employers to issue prepaid salary cards to domestic workers

Updated 05 February 2018
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Saudi Labor Ministry calls on employers to issue prepaid salary cards to domestic workers

JEDDAH: The Ministry of Labor and Social Development has renewed its call for individual employers to issue prepaid payroll or salary cards to domestic workers as soon as they arrive in the Kingdom, the Saudi Press Agency (SPA) reported.
To get a prepaid payroll card, the employer (sponsor) must register for the service at a bank, then, through the Musaned online portal (www.musaned.com.sa), he can create an electronic recruitment contract and specify the worker’s monthly wage before saving the contract on the website and printing a copy.
“The ministry’s wage protection system aims to protect the rights of all parties in the contractual relationship — both the employers and domestic workers — and electronically document employment contracts for these workers,” said Khalid Aba Al-Khail, the ministry’s spokesman.
He added: “By issuing prepaid payroll cards, workers’ wages will be transferred to their bank accounts, which will guarantee the protection of their wages.”
Aba Al-Khail pointed out that the wage protection system covers all kinds of domestic workers in the Kingdom, and it will gradually be enforced. The ministry wants all employers, who already have domestic workers inside Saudi Arabia, to get on board with the new scheme within six months.
He explained that the program aims to protect the rights of both employers and workers, improve work circumstances for domestic workers, increase their job security, and promote the principles of human rights in Saudi Arabia.
“Contract services will be available through the Musaned online portal and smartphone app,” he said.
The ministry’s spokesman called on all recruitment offices and companies to raise the awareness of their clients and domestic workers on the rights and obligations of this contractual relationship.
Both parties can report violations or problems through the customer service call center at 19911.


Saudi sources deny ‘unsubstantiated’ reports of permitting alcohol

Updated 16 June 2019
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Saudi sources deny ‘unsubstantiated’ reports of permitting alcohol

  • “The leadership has made it clear from day one; it is simply not happening,”SCTH source tells Arab News
  • The SCTH is responsible for licensing and rating hotels and restaurants

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia has no plans to allow the sale or public consumption of alcohol, a senior government source has told Arab News.

The official with access to relevant decision-makers categorically denied “unsubstantiated” media reports in some international and regional news outlets.

“If you read the fake news, you will notice it is all based on hearsay and tweets by accounts known to have a questionable agenda when talking about the Kingdom,” he said.

“As the country moves forward with its reform plans, we expect much speculation and attempts by critics to hold us back. And while people are allowed to speculate and criticize, their speculation should not be treated as the truth.”

A second source at the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) also denied such reports. “The leadership has made it clear from day one; it is simply not happening,” he told Arab News. “I have not heard of any plans to allow alcohol in major cities, free zones or new projects.”

The SCTH is responsible for licensing and rating hotels and restaurants. Any plans for the sale or consumption of alcohol would have to go through the commission for implementation. 

Saudi Arabia has witnessed substantial social reforms over the past three years, such as the curbing of the previously unchecked power of the religious police, reopening cinemas and allowing women to drive.

There has also been a major shift on previously prohibited public entertainment and gender mixing. International artists including Mariah Carey, Yanni, Andrea Bocelli, Enrique Iglesias and Black Eyed Peas have all performed.

Tourism projects have included pop-up versions of international restaurants such as Signor Sassi, Nusr-Et and Nobu. None has served alcohol.

“Officials have repeatedly said all changes were and will always be in line with Islamic teachings and traditions,” the senior source told Arab News.