Dubai ruler opens temporary ‘Museum of the Future’ as part of World Government Summit

The museum offers visitors an interactive experience about the future of artificial intelligence. (Photo courtesy: Dubai Media Office)
Updated 11 February 2018
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Dubai ruler opens temporary ‘Museum of the Future’ as part of World Government Summit

DUBAI: Vice President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum Friday opened a temporary “Museum of the Future” as part of the 2018 World Government Summit that is set to run between Feb. 11-13 in Dubai.
The museum offers visitors an interactive experience about the future of artificial intelligence (AI) and presents exhibitions on how it could impact different aspects of life in years to come.
The Dubai ruler was accompanied by Dubai Crown Prince Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum on the tour.
Sheikh Mohammed shared his vision for the future of the UAE, saying: “The Museum of the Future is a unique incubator for futuristic innovations and design… We are determined to make the UAE a major contributor to future development.
“The UAE government sets an example to the governments of the world in adopting technological advancements as a driver for development. AI is key when we speak about tackling future challenges,” he added.
The soon-to-be-opened permanent version of the museum will open its doors in 2019 and is currently still in the construction phase. It is set to be an incubator for futuristic innovations and design.


Apple’s Cook to China: keep opening for sake of global economy

Updated 23 March 2019
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Apple’s Cook to China: keep opening for sake of global economy

  • Cook’s comments come as Apple weathers sinking sales in China
  • Despite official pledges and repeated assurances that China would continue to open its markets

BEIJING: Apple chief executive Tim Cook nudged China on Saturday to open up and said the future would depend on global collaboration, as the United States and China remained locked in a bitter trade dispute.
“We encourage China to continue to open up, we see that as essential, not only for China to reach its full potential, but for the global economy to thrive,” Cook said at a China Development Forum in Beijing.
Despite official pledges and repeated assurances that China would continue to open its markets, some analysts worry that its reform project has slowed or even stalled under President Xi Jinping, who has sought greater control over the economy and a bigger role for state-owned firms at the expense of the private sector.
Cook’s comments come as Apple weathers sinking sales in China because of a contracting smartphone market, increasing pressure from Chinese rivals, and slowing upgrade cycles. The company reported a revenue drop of 26 percent in the greater China region during the quarter ending in December.
Before those results came out, in a January letter to investors, Cook blamed the company’s poor China performance on trade tension between the United States and China, suggesting that pressure on the economy was hurting sales in China.