Dubai ruler opens temporary ‘Museum of the Future’ as part of World Government Summit

The museum offers visitors an interactive experience about the future of artificial intelligence. (Photo courtesy: Dubai Media Office)
Updated 11 February 2018
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Dubai ruler opens temporary ‘Museum of the Future’ as part of World Government Summit

DUBAI: Vice President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum Friday opened a temporary “Museum of the Future” as part of the 2018 World Government Summit that is set to run between Feb. 11-13 in Dubai.
The museum offers visitors an interactive experience about the future of artificial intelligence (AI) and presents exhibitions on how it could impact different aspects of life in years to come.
The Dubai ruler was accompanied by Dubai Crown Prince Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum on the tour.
Sheikh Mohammed shared his vision for the future of the UAE, saying: “The Museum of the Future is a unique incubator for futuristic innovations and design… We are determined to make the UAE a major contributor to future development.
“The UAE government sets an example to the governments of the world in adopting technological advancements as a driver for development. AI is key when we speak about tackling future challenges,” he added.
The soon-to-be-opened permanent version of the museum will open its doors in 2019 and is currently still in the construction phase. It is set to be an incubator for futuristic innovations and design.


Moody’s downgrades Nissan’s credit rating, citing weak sales in US

Updated 11 sec ago
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Moody’s downgrades Nissan’s credit rating, citing weak sales in US

  • Nissan reported a 45 percent plunge in annual operating profit in the year ending March
  • Moody’s cut its rating of Nissan’s credit to ‘A3’ from ‘A2’

TOKYO: Moody’s cut its rating on Nissan by one notch on Friday, citing weak sales in the United States and casting a shadow on the Japanese automaker’s move to improve its business following a decline in its annual profit.
Nissan — hit by former Chairman Carlos Ghosn’s arrest last year and troubles at its North American business — reported a 45 percent plunge in annual operating profit in the year ending March, and forecast a 28 percent drop in profit this fiscal year.
Moody’s cut its rating of Nissan’s credit to “A3” from “A2,” adding that the outlook was negative.
“The downgrade reflects the continuing slide in Nissan’s profitability, driven by weak sales in the US, its largest market,” Moody’s Vice President Motoki Yanase said in a statement.
While Nissan’s new strategy focuses on margin over unit sales growth and refreshing old models to improve its brand value, the ratings agency expects the overhaul will take “several years.”
“The negative outlook on Nissan reflects execution risk as Nissan implements its business strategies globally, reforms its corporate governance and stabilizes its alliance with Renault,” it said.
France’s Renault is the top shareholder in Nissan.