Egypt’s Media Council suspends SNL Arabia over ‘sexual implications’

SNL Bil Arabi is a late-night sketch, adapted from its original long-running American show on NBC, premiered in Arabic in 2016.
Updated 12 February 2018
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Egypt’s Media Council suspends SNL Arabia over ‘sexual implications’

CAIRO: Egypt’s Supreme Media Council on Sunday suspended the late-night sketch comedy show “Saturday Night Live Arabia” for containing “sexual implications,” local media reports said.
Also known as “Saturday Night Live bil Arabi,” the variety TV program adapted from its original long-running American show on NBC premiered in Arabic in 2016.
The council stressed that “the program has always used words, phrases and sexual implications deemed inappropriate to viewers,” adding that “it contradicts ethical and professional standards.”
The council sent a letter stating the program’s suspension to the channel airing it.
The regulatory body, established by Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi in 2016, says it is responsible for the values, ethics, and professionalism of the content broadcasting on media shows.
It has the power to fine or suspend publications and broadcasters and approve or revoke licenses for foreign media.


Egyptian military court sentences journalist to 10 years

Updated 22 May 2018
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Egyptian military court sentences journalist to 10 years

CAIRO: An Egyptian military court has sentenced a freelance journalist who reported on the Sinai insurgency to 10 years in prison on terror-related charges.
The Cairo military court on Tuesday convicted Ismail Alexandrani of spreading false news and joining an outlawed group, without identifying it. The verdict can be appealed.
Alexandrani was detained in 2015 upon his return to Egypt after delivering a presentation on Sinai militancy in Berlin. He worked for several news outlets in Egypt.
Egypt has heavily restricted media access to the northern Sinai, where it has struggled to combat a Daesh-led insurgency that has carried out attacks across the country.
Egyptian authorities have jailed several journalists as part of a wide-ranging crackdown on dissent, and have passed vague laws criminalizing the dissemination of “false news.”