US patent for King Saud University invention in information security

Updated 13 February 2018
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US patent for King Saud University invention in information security

RIYADH: In a major academic breakthrough for scientists from the King Saud University (KSU), their information security invention based on iris and fingerprint recognition has won the prestigious US patent.
“The United States Patent and Trademark Office has approved and issued a patent entitled ‘Systems and Methods Improving Cryptosystems with Biometrics’ under the US patent number 9,825,761 to the KSU,” Professor Muhammad Khurram Khan, one of the co-inventors, told Arab News on Monday. Other inventors from the KSU include Professor K. Alghathbar and Dr. Maqsood Mahmud, Khan said.
He added that owing to the large-scale proliferation of information and communication systems, security of data is of paramount concern for individuals, corporations and governments alike.
He said: “Conventional cryptosystems do not need any complex image processing and pattern recognition procedures as used in biometrics-based identification systems.”
Biometrics, which refers to methods for recognizing humans based on traits such as iris and fingerprints, represents the future of information security systems around the world.
“Biometrics can play an instrumental role and add an intricate layer in developing more secure and robust cryptosystems with increased confusion and diffusion properties,” Khan said.
“This invention is an innovative step toward building a resilient and secure cryptosystem while maintaining security and usability requirements.
“Biometrics is a great alternative and has a huge potential to substitute passwords, which are hard to remember and easy to be hacked or guessed,” he said, adding: “It also offers a new mechanism for securing the cryptographic keys.
“Thus, cryptographic keys can be protected by biometric authentication and it can also be used to encrypt or decrypt any kind of data. Our invention achieves it with high accuracy and security.”
Cryptography is a widely accepted solution to modern security systems and researchers are always looking to develop more secure, robust and resilient algorithms to protect critical data and systems from intruders and hackers.
Biometrics, when combined with classical and modern cryptographic algorithms, can achieve more robust security without compromising the performance of cryptosystems.
“This unique invention is an innovative contribution in the field of biometrics-based cryptosystems and very useful to enhance the secure storage and communication of data,” Khan said, adding that the invention meets with the new goals and aims of Saudi Vision 2030 to transform Saudi Arabia into a knowledge-based economy.


Disappointed fans hail improved performance by Saudi Green Falcons but defeat ends World Cup dream

Updated 21 June 2018
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Disappointed fans hail improved performance by Saudi Green Falcons but defeat ends World Cup dream

  • A fan named Yousif, who watched the match at the General Sports Authority viewing tent, was happy that the game at least was close this time.
  • Saudi Arabia will face off against Egypt, who also lost their opening two group A games against Uruguay and Russia, on June 25.

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia’s World Cup dreams were shattered after Uruguay beat the Green Falcons 1-0 in the second of the three group-stage matches. Most Saudi fans in Jeddah were much happier with the team’s performance in game two, following the resounding 5-0 defeat by host nation Russia in the opening match on June 14, but still bitterly disappointed by the loss, which means they cannot qualify for the knockout stages.

Yousif, who watched the match at the General Sports Authority viewing tent, was happy that the game at least was close this time. “Although we lost, the performance was much better than the first game with Russia. I hope we win our next match,” he said.

Nasrah, who watched the game with her two sons, said: “I was really disappointed because we played good today and nothing less than a win should have been acceptable. I am also disappointed to see the looks on my boys faces when the game ended as they were hoping for a win.”

Khalid Al-Raghbi said at least it had been a good match to watch. “We played a bit better today,” he added. “I wish we would have won but at least we performed better than our last match against Russia.”

Before the game, Ibrahim Al-Turki had been optimistic about Saudi Arabia’s chances. “We didn’t expect today’s result. I was thinking that Saudi would win by two goals, and Uruguay would score one,” he said.

The result was especially disappointing given the close result and the number of chances the Saudis had to score, said Badr, who added: “I don’t know what to tell you because we are deeply disappointed. At least if we lost with a big defeat I would say we deserved it. We had the potential but we could not score.”

Shadi Al-Ghamdi said he wished the national team’s much improved performance in their second game had been more evident in their first. “I am very proud of the players, I thought they played very well. I just wish they had played like this against Russia," he said.

Safah was less complimentary and said that the Saudi players had let their fans down, adding: “They seemed scared whenever they attempted to score any goals.”

Saudi Arabia will face off against Egypt, who also lost their opening two group A games against Uruguay and Russia, on June 25. It will be the final game in the competition for both sides, with only pride to play for, as they battle it out to see who will finish third in the group and who will be left in bottom spot.