Meghan Markle made ‘secret’ visits to London mosque to meet Grenfell tragedy victims

She reportedly made up to four secret visits to the Al-Manaar Mosque in West London. (File photo: Reuters)
Updated 13 February 2018
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Meghan Markle made ‘secret’ visits to London mosque to meet Grenfell tragedy victims

CAIRO: US actress and soon-to-be British royal Meghan Markle has reportedly been paying secret visits to a mosque in West London to meet the victims of the Grenfell Tower tragedy.
Prince Harry’s fiancee has reportedly made up to four secret visits to the Al-Manaar Mosque in West London to meet with survivors and relatives of victims of the inferno.
The tragedy took place last June and left 71 people dead.
Following in the footsteps of the late Princess Diana, Markle has been echoing the charitable efforts of her late mother-in-law-to-be in recent weeks.
Markle, who is set to wed Britain’s Prince Harry in May, made those visits alone, but was escorted by a royal protection officer and one of the prince’s aides, the Mirror reported.
A leading Grenfell community member quoted by the Mirror said: “Meghan’s visits mean so much to us. She has a special place in our hearts.”
A royal source also told the newspaper: “Ms. Markle has regularly been making private visits to organizations as she gets to know the charity sector.”
Harry and Prince William publicly visited the Al-Manaar Mosque in September to support victims of the June 14 blaze.
Chief executive Abdulrahman Sayed said Markle had made “three or four” royal visits since Harry’s trip.


What We Are Reading Today: The Philosopher, the Priest, and the Painter

Updated 20 August 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: The Philosopher, the Priest, and the Painter

In the Louvre museum hangs a portrait that is considered the iconic image of René Descartes, the great 17th-century French philosopher. 

And the painter of the work? The Dutch master Frans Hals — or so it was long believed, until the work was downgraded to a copy of an original. But where is the authentic version, and who painted it? Is the man in the painting — and in its original — really Descartes?

A unique combination of philosophy, biography, and art history, The Philosopher, the Priest, and the Painter investigates the remarkable individuals and circumstances behind a small portrait.

Through this image — and the intersecting lives of a brilliant philosopher, a Catholic priest, and a gifted painter — Steven Nadler opens a fascinating portal into Descartes’s life and times, skillfully presenting an accessible introduction to Descartes’s philosophical and scientific ideas, and an illuminating tour of the volatile political and religious environment of the Dutch Golden Age.

 As Nadler shows, Descartes’s innovative ideas about the world, about human nature and knowledge, and about philosophy itself, stirred great controversy. Philosophical and theological critics vigorously opposed his views, and civil and ecclesiastic authorities condemned his writings. Nevertheless, Descartes’s thought came to dominate the philosophical world of the period, and can rightly be called the philosophy of the 17th century.

 Shedding light on a well-known image, The Philosopher, the Priest, and the Painter offers an engaging exploration of a celebrated philosopher’s world and work.

Steven Nadler is the William H. Hay II professor of Philosophy at the University of Wisconsin — Madison. His books include Rembrandt’s Jews, which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize; Spinoza: A Life, which won the Koret Jewish Book Award; and A Book Forged in Hell: Spinoza’s Scandalous Treatise and the Birth of the Secular Age (Princeton).