Un-forbidden love: Saudis enjoy second ‘religious police-free’ Valentine’s Day

A florist in Jeddah freely sells roses to a customer on Valentine’s Day. In previous years, the religious police confiscated roses on Feb. 14. (AN photo by Adnan Mahdali)
Updated 15 February 2018
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Un-forbidden love: Saudis enjoy second ‘religious police-free’ Valentine’s Day

JEDDAH: Saudis celebrated Valentine’s Day and its message of love and peace in the absence of religious police after a fatwa permitting the celebrations was circulated via Twitter.
Gift and flower shops opened their doors without any hassle or confiscation from the religious police, who formerly banned florists from working on Valentine’s Day and monitored the Kingdom’s streets for any violations. This was confirmed by market visits by a number of Arab News reporters in different Saudi cities.
Speaking to Arab News, Sheikh Ahmed Qasim Al-Ghamdi, former president of the Commission for the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice in Makkah, endorsed Valentine’s Day as a social celebration similar to the National Day and Mother’s Day.
“All these are common social matters shared by humanity and are not religious issues that require the existence of a religious proof to permit it,” he said.
Describing love as a natural feeling, the cleric said that Valentine’s Day celebrated “a positive aspect of the human being.”
Al-Ghamdi said the celebration of love was not limited to non-Muslims. “There are many worldly things that we deal with morally that may be of interest to non-Muslim communities and became more common among Muslim communities because of their popularity,” he said, citing the Prophet as an example. “The Prophet dealt with many worldly things that came from non-Muslims.”
He rejected the view that marking the day is an imitation of non-Muslims and said: “Even greeting peaceful non-Muslims in their special religious holidays is permitted without participating in a forbidden act that contradicts Islam.”
Al-Ghamdi stressed his support for fatwas that permit the celebration of Valentine’s Day and exchanging of gifts.
A fatwa issued on Feb. 13 by the fatwa secretary of Dar Al-Ifta Al-Misriya (Egyptian Religious Edict House), Ahmed Mamdouh, said: “There is no harm to allocate one day to show love to one another.”
Tunisian Grand Mufti Othman Battikh also rejected the claim that Valentine’s Day is solely a Christian tradition. “Anything that brings people closer together is good and desirable,” he said, adding that Muslims can celebrate without departing from Islamic ethics.
Mohammed Al-Shahat Al-Jundi, a member of the Islamic Research Center, said that the celebration helps “maintain ties of kinship.”
Al-Ghamdi described the current religious police as “very useful and conciliatory.”


Research center issues report on Saudi Arabia’s relief efforts

The center reported on Saudi Arabia’s humanitarian work in support of refugees. (SPA/File)
Updated 35 min 56 sec ago
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Research center issues report on Saudi Arabia’s relief efforts

  • The report refers to a study conducted by the World Bank between 1975 and 2016 which said that Saudi aid is equivalent to 3.7 percent of its GD

JEDDAH: The Center for Research Intercommunication and Knowledge (CFRIK) has published a report on Saudi Arabia’s humanitarian work in support of refugees and forcefully displaced migrants around the world. 

The report includes sections titled “Saudi humanitarian and relief action throughout history,” “Humanitarian aid to Yemen,” “Saudi presence in times of difficulty,” “Humanitarian Aid for Palestine,” “Kingdom’s aid for Lebanon, Syria and Jordan,” “Assistance to Somalia and Burma,” and “King Salman Humanitarian Aid And Relief Center.” 

The report refers to a study conducted by the World Bank between 1975 and 2016 which said that Saudi aid is equivalent to 3.7 percent of its GDP, noting that the UN requests that countries donate 0.7 percent of their GDP to humanitarian assistance and relief globally.