Heritage meets the future: Lufthansa presents a new brand design

Lufthansa recognized that the company needed to modernize the aircraft appearance in order to remain up to date.
Updated 20 February 2018
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Heritage meets the future: Lufthansa presents a new brand design

Lufthansa revealed its new, modernized brand image to customers and employees at two major events at the Frankfurt and Munich hubs earlier this month. The most visible change is the new aircraft livery. In front of more than 3,000 guests in Frankfurt and Munich, Lufthansa officially presented a Boeing 747-8 and an Airbus A321 with the new design.
In the previous week, individual details created interactive discussions, especially on social media. The response to the new appearance was predominantly positive, although some people missed the traditional yellow tone; nevertheless, it will receive a specific function to serve as a means of orientation and differentiation. The color will be found in the future on every boarding pass and at every Lufthansa counter at the airport.
“Lufthansa has changed and is more modern and successful than ever. From now on, this will also be visible to the public through a new design,” said Carsten Spohr, chairman of the executive board of Deutsche Lufthansa AG.
“The crane has always been with us and clearly stands for the promising performance of Lufthansa. To this day, it still stands as a symbol of highest quality, excellent service, flying expertise, reliability, innovative spirit, and it stands for trust.”
Against the backdrop of digitalization and changing customer requirements, Lufthansa recognized that the company needed to modernize the aircraft appearance in order to remain up to date. The group invests €2 billion ($2.3 billion) a year in new, fuel-efficient aircraft.
“The modernization of Lufthansa is only possible thanks to the commitment of our employees, who are the best in the industry. They are the actual face of the brand,” Spohr added.
The crane, designed exactly 100 years ago by graphic artist Otto Firle, remains the airline’s iconic symbol. In the future, it will be slimmer and fit for the digital world. A thinner ring makes the crane look more elegant, bringing it into the foreground and granting it more space. All in all, the trademark will gain lightness and elegance. The familiar blue-yellow color combination of Lufthansa will also be retained — but the use of these primary colors will be redefined.


New J-Clinic to harness machine learning tech

Updated 25 September 2018
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New J-Clinic to harness machine learning tech

MIT and Community Jameel, the social enterprise organization founded and chaired by Mohammed Abdul Latif Jameel ‘78, launched the Abdul Latif Jameel Clinic for Machine Learning in Health (J-Clinic) on Tuesday. This is the fourth major collaborative effort between MIT and Community Jameel.
J-Clinic, a key part of the MIT Quest for Intelligence, will focus on developing machine learning technologies to revolutionize the prevention, detection, and treatment of disease. It will concentrate on creating and commercializing high-precision, affordable, and scalable machine learning technologies in areas of health care ranging from diagnostics to pharmaceuticals, with three main areas of focus:
l Preventative medicine methods and technologies with the potential to change the course of non-infectious disease by stopping it in its tracks.
l Cost-effective diagnostic tests that may be able to both detect and alleviate health problems.
l Drug discovery and development to enable faster and cheaper discovery, development, and manufacture of new pharmaceuticals, particularly those targeted for individually customized therapies.
J-Clinic’s holistic approach will utilize MIT’s expertise in cellular and medical biology, computer science, engineering, and the social sciences, among other areas.
“The health care system has no shortage of data,” said MIT President L. Rafael Reif. “But it has far too little access to the kinds of tools and experts who can translate population-level data into clinical insights that could make it possible to tune care precisely for individuals. Building on MIT’s deep expertise in fields from cancer to neuroscience, and our longstanding connections to Boston’s world-class medical community, J-Clinic offers an accelerated path to creating new technologies that could help make health care more effective everywhere — from villages in developing nations to major teaching hospitals.”
“The J-Clinic will positively impact the world by accelerating the creation of machine learning technologies and algorithms that will make preventing, detecting, and treating disease more precise, affordable, and personalized,” said Anantha P. Chandrakasan, dean of the MIT School of Engineering, and Vannevar Bush, professor of electrical engineering and computer science, who will serve as J-Clinic’s chair. “It will be a truly multifaceted effort that amplifies synergies between the life sciences and the latest research in human and machine intelligence. J-Clinic will inspire innovation for the betterment of humanity.”
“Channeling MIT’s machine learning expertise into health care will transform medical outcomes for people around the world,” said Fady Jameel, president of Community Jameel International. “Health care has been an important sphere of activity for Community Jameel since our earliest days, from founding the first nonprofit hospital for physical rehabilitation in Saudi Arabia, to partnering with the King Salman Center for Disability Research. J-Clinic continues our journey of supporting cutting-edge research and driving innovation in health care, in Saudi Arabia and around the whole world.”