Mother, 3 children die of wounds from Daesh-claimed Yemen attack

Fighters from the separatist Southern Transitional Council gather at the site of two suicide car bombings that targeted the headquarters of an anti-terror unit the day before, in the southern Yemeni port of Aden. (AFP)
Updated 25 February 2018
0

Mother, 3 children die of wounds from Daesh-claimed Yemen attack

ADEN: A mother and three of her children have died of their wounds from a double suicide bombing in Yemen’s port city of Aden, medical sources said Sunday, raising the death toll to 12.
The family was among seven people who succumbed to wounds sustained in Saturday’s attack, which was claimed by Daesh.
Five other people, including security officers and a child, were killed on the spot when two suicide car bombings hit the headquarters of an anti-terror unit on a beach near the Tawahi district of Aden.
Daesh claimed the attack through its propaganda arm Amaq.
The bombings come after deadly clashes in Aden last month in which southern separatists seized much of the strategic coastal city from Yemen’s Saudi-backed government.
During the chaos in Yemen over the past few years, Daesh has repeatedly attacked Aden, where the government is based, claiming hundreds of victims and mainly targeting government forces.


Pro-Turkey Syria rebels accept Idlib deal, albeit cautiously

Updated 3 min 53 sec ago
0

Pro-Turkey Syria rebels accept Idlib deal, albeit cautiously

  • The National Liberation Front rebel alliance accepts deal reached or Idlib, but says they remain on their guard
  • Syria’s war has killed more than 360,000 people and displaced millions from their homes since erupting in 2011
BEIRUT: Pro-Turkey rebels have cautiously accepted a Moscow-Ankara deal to prevent a Russia-backed regime attack on Syria’s last major opposition bastion of Idlib, while a small militant group has rejected it.
The dominant force in the northwestern region bordering Turkey, the Hayat Tahrir Al-Sham (HTS) alliance led by militants of Syria’s former Al-Qaeda affiliate, had on Sunday however still not responded.
Late Saturday, the National Liberation Front (NLF) rebel alliance in a statement accepted the deal reached on Monday for Idlib, but said they remained on their guard.
They announced “our full cooperation with our Turkish ally in helping to make a success their efforts to spare civilians from the afflictions of war.”
“But we will stay alert to any betrayal by the Russians, the regime or the Iranians,” the NLF warned, fearing the agreement to be “temporary.”
“We will not abandon our weapons, our land or our revolution” against the Russia- and Iran-backed forces of President Bashar Assad, the rebels said.
Also on Saturday, in a statement circulated on social media, the Al-Qaeda-linked Hurras Al-Deen rejected the agreement reached in the Russian resort of Sochi.
“We at the Hurras Al-Deen organization again announce our rejection of these conspiracies,” it said.
Monday’s agreement provides for a U-shaped buffer zone 15 to 20 kilometers (9 to 12 miles) wide to be set up around Idlib.
Under the deal, all factions in the planned demilitarized zone must hand over their heavy weapons by October 10, and radical groups must withdraw by October 15.
Both the extremist Hurras Al-Deen and NLF rebels are present inside this planned buffer area, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights says.
But the dominant HTS alliance is also widely present, according to the Britain-based monitor.
The militant-led group — which controls more than half of the Idlib region — has not officially responded to the agreement.
But its propaganda agency Ebaa has cast doubt on Turkey’s motivations.
In August, HTS leader Abu Mohamed Al-Jolani warned opposition factions in Idlib against handing over their weapons.
Syria’s war has killed more than 360,000 people and displaced millions from their homes since erupting in 2011 with the brutal repression of anti-Assad protests.