Netflix set to produce company’s first Arabic original series

Netflix is set to produce its first Arabic original series. (Shutterstock)
Updated 26 February 2018
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Netflix set to produce company’s first Arabic original series

DUBAI: Netflix is set to produce the company’s first Arabic original series, the online streaming service announced in a press statement on Monday.
The series, titled Jinn (which means ghost), will revolve around a group of Arab teenagers who find themselves confronted by a ghost boy in the ancient city of Petra.
The supernatural drama will have its characters’ friendships and romances tested when they attempt to stop a great darkness threatening to end the world.
Set to be filmed in Amman, the show will be helmed by some of the Middle East’s hottest up-and-coming talent, with Lebanese Mir-Jean Bou Chaaya (Very Big Shot) directing and Jordanian Bassel Ghandour (Oscar-nominated Theeb) penning the script.
“This is a great opportunity to portray Arab youth in a very unique way. The level of authenticity Netflix is trying to achieve with this show is definitely what attracted me the most to be part of this project,” Mir-Jean Bou Chaaya said.
Netflix’s Vice President of International Orignal Series Erik Barmack said the company is “extremely excited to bring this story to a global audience, and to celebrate Arab youth and culture. We can’t wait to share more details later this year.”
The show would be the second project the company will be running in the region with its first being an Arabic stand-up comedy special starring Lebanese comedian Adel Karam.


Facebook to clearly label political advertising in Britain, CTO says

Updated 26 April 2018
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Facebook to clearly label political advertising in Britain, CTO says

LONDON: Facebook will introduce new measures to boost transparency around adverts in Britain by June this year and require political ads to be clearly labelled, the firm’s Chief Technology Officer told a British parliamentary committee.
In a written submission to the UK parliament’s media committee, Mike Schroepfer said those wanting to run political adverts would have to complete an authorization process and the messages would also have to display who paid for them.
Facebook has said that the personal information of about 87 million users might have been improperly shared with political consultancy Cambridge Analytica, which worked on Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential election campaign.
Lawmakers have also raised concern over the use of social media in Britain’s referendum decision to leave the European Union in 2016.
“I want to start by echoing our CEO, Mark Zuckerberg: what happened with Cambridge Analytica represents a breach of trust, and we are deeply sorry. We made mistakes and we are taking steps to make sure it doesn’t happen again,” Schroepfer wrote.
Earlier this month, Zuckerberg apologized to US senators for issues that have beset Facebook, including shortcomings over data protection.
But the 33-year-old Internet mogul managed to deflect any specific promises to support any congressional regulation of the world’s largest social media network and other US Internet companies.
Schroepfer, who was appearing before the British media committee on Thursday, said it was clear Facebook had not done enough to ensure its tools from “potentially being used for harm” or take a broad enough view of its responsibility.
“That was a mistake,” he wrote.