Netflix set to produce company’s first Arabic original series

Netflix is set to produce its first Arabic original series. (Shutterstock)
Updated 26 February 2018
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Netflix set to produce company’s first Arabic original series

DUBAI: Netflix is set to produce the company’s first Arabic original series, the online streaming service announced in a press statement on Monday.
The series, titled Jinn (which means ghost), will revolve around a group of Arab teenagers who find themselves confronted by a ghost boy in the ancient city of Petra.
The supernatural drama will have its characters’ friendships and romances tested when they attempt to stop a great darkness threatening to end the world.
Set to be filmed in Amman, the show will be helmed by some of the Middle East’s hottest up-and-coming talent, with Lebanese Mir-Jean Bou Chaaya (Very Big Shot) directing and Jordanian Bassel Ghandour (Oscar-nominated Theeb) penning the script.
“This is a great opportunity to portray Arab youth in a very unique way. The level of authenticity Netflix is trying to achieve with this show is definitely what attracted me the most to be part of this project,” Mir-Jean Bou Chaaya said.
Netflix’s Vice President of International Orignal Series Erik Barmack said the company is “extremely excited to bring this story to a global audience, and to celebrate Arab youth and culture. We can’t wait to share more details later this year.”
The show would be the second project the company will be running in the region with its first being an Arabic stand-up comedy special starring Lebanese comedian Adel Karam.


Nicaragua police raid opposition paper, end rights groups’ permits

View of damages at the office of Nicaraguan journalist Carlos Fernando Chamorro, who rents at the building of the NGO Center of Investigation on Communication (CINCO) in Managua on December 14, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 16 December 2018
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Nicaragua police raid opposition paper, end rights groups’ permits

  • Confidencial’s front door was sealed with tape following the raid. Police seized work equipment and documents

MANAGUA: Nicaraguan police have raided the offices of an opposition daily and then stripped human rights and activist groups’ permission to operate, those targeted said Saturday.
Nine police officers armed with rifles entered the offices late Friday and started pushing people, beating others and making fun of reporters after journalist Carlos Fernando Chamorro challenged them to take on his media outlet without a search warrant in his online daily Confidencial and news broadcasts Esta Semana and Esta Noche, he said.
What you are doing “is just de facto. If you have the order, I ask you to show it,” Chamorro said from the street to the agent who barred him and other colleagues from entering the offices.
“Police did not show any order at all... so this is an armed assault on private property, freedom of the press, freedom of expression and free enterprise,” he later told reporters.
Confidencial’s front door was sealed with tape following the raid. Police seized work equipment and documents.
Chamorro went to the police headquarters to demand the return of equipment, noting that the newspaper and television programs “are private companies attached to the commercial register, and have nothing to do with organizations that are being persecuted.”
The offices of the Nicaraguan Center for Human Rights (CENIDH) and four other NGOs in Managua were also occupied, and lawmakers canceled their permits to operate.
“Brutal display of brute force against journalists from @confidencial_ni in Nicaragua... this regime... aims to demolish critical voices in its country,” Human Rights Watch director Jose Miguel Vivanco said on Twitter.
Leftist President Daniel Ortega first came to power in 1979 as a leader of the leftist Sandinista rebels that toppled the US-backed Somoza family dictatorship. After leaving office in 1990 he returned to power in 2007.