Netflix set to produce company’s first Arabic original series

Netflix is set to produce its first Arabic original series. (Shutterstock)
Updated 26 February 2018
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Netflix set to produce company’s first Arabic original series

DUBAI: Netflix is set to produce the company’s first Arabic original series, the online streaming service announced in a press statement on Monday.
The series, titled Jinn (which means ghost), will revolve around a group of Arab teenagers who find themselves confronted by a ghost boy in the ancient city of Petra.
The supernatural drama will have its characters’ friendships and romances tested when they attempt to stop a great darkness threatening to end the world.
Set to be filmed in Amman, the show will be helmed by some of the Middle East’s hottest up-and-coming talent, with Lebanese Mir-Jean Bou Chaaya (Very Big Shot) directing and Jordanian Bassel Ghandour (Oscar-nominated Theeb) penning the script.
“This is a great opportunity to portray Arab youth in a very unique way. The level of authenticity Netflix is trying to achieve with this show is definitely what attracted me the most to be part of this project,” Mir-Jean Bou Chaaya said.
Netflix’s Vice President of International Orignal Series Erik Barmack said the company is “extremely excited to bring this story to a global audience, and to celebrate Arab youth and culture. We can’t wait to share more details later this year.”
The show would be the second project the company will be running in the region with its first being an Arabic stand-up comedy special starring Lebanese comedian Adel Karam.


Cartoon tribute to Christchurch attack victims praised on social media

Updated 8 min 48 sec ago
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Cartoon tribute to Christchurch attack victims praised on social media

LONDON: A cartoon by Canberra Times artist Pat Campbell representing the 50 lives lost in the Christchurch terror attack depicted in the New Zealand “silver fern” has been praised widely on social media.
The cartoon by Campbell, an award-winning artist, shows Muslims in the different stages of prayer. His original which had 49 figures represented, published on Saturday March 16, was later updated by the artist himself to reflect the 50 lives lost.
Speaking to BuzzFeed News, he said: “I was thinking of the silver fern and thinking the pinnae (the individual bits coming off the stem) looked like figures, a similar number to the number of victims.”
The artist added that he owns land just outside the city and has friends in Christchurch, which prompted him to produce the artwork.
Having not slept well in the wake of the atrocity, Campbell got the idea while lying in bed.
“There were a lot of silhouettes to draw,” Campbell said. “They just kept coming. It brought home to me the death toll and the destruction one man can do with the right weapons.”