Italy taps ‘design ambassador’ to photograph Saudi UNESCO heritage sites for posterity

Luca Capuano, an Italian design ambassador and a photographer for UNESCO, is on his first visit to Saudi Arabia. (AN photo)
Updated 06 March 2018
0

Italy taps ‘design ambassador’ to photograph Saudi UNESCO heritage sites for posterity

JEDDAH: Italy wants one of its most celebrated photographers to capture images of Saudi UNESCO heritage sites for posterity.
“We have UNESCO sites in Italy, and we have UNESCO sites here. We want to create a link. We want to always show what brings us together, not what divides us,” said the Italian Consul General, Elisabetta Martini.
She was speaking on Sunday at an Italian Design Day, organized by the Italian Consulate at the Italian Cultural Club in Jeddah.
Also there was Luca Capuano, an Italian design ambassador and a photographer for UNESCO, the UN cultural agency. He is on his first visit to Saudi Arabia.
“I’ve seen a lot of interesting things. I’d like to explore the Kingdom more, and come back here again for further exploration,” he told Arab News.
Capuano, who is noted for his architectural work, was commissioned to photograph Italy’s 44 World Heritage sites in 2010, and in 2016 he documented the Dheisheh Palestinian refugee camp near Bethlehem in the occupied West Bank, also a World Heritage site.
“We hope to produce a catalog of UNESCO sites from the Western Region of Saudi Arabia photographed by Capuano,” Martini said.
Saudi Instagram sensation Hamza Jamjoom was also at the event.
“What interested me most is the environment … and of course the artwork,” he said. “It’s a great event.”


Malaysia welcomes its first durian-friendly hotel

An overview of the Durian Research Center. (AN photo)
Updated 16 July 2019
0

Malaysia welcomes its first durian-friendly hotel

  • Tan sees the resort’s agritourism ecosystem as a long-term goal toward creating a platform for durian research and cultivation

KUALA LUMPUR: Durians are known for their distinct, pungent smell, which many foreigners describe as a combination of rotten onions and old socks. As such, most hotels in Asia forbid the fruit on their premises.
But with the rising popularity of durians among locals and foreign tourists, Malaysia is welcoming its first durian-friendly hotel and resort.
Situated an hour from Kuala Lumpur’s city center, the beautiful, scenic Bangi Golf Resort includes a hotel overlooking a golf course, and an agriculture farm.
“When you first go into any hotels, you usually see the signs ‘durian is not allowed’ or ‘durian is forbidden’,” said Tan Ban Keat, director of the resort. “We soften the tone for the hotel to be ‘durians are allowed in durian-friendly zones’.”
Hotel patrons can buy, eat and bring durians to designated zones throughout the resort.
“We’re actually the first hotel to practice that,” said Tan, adding that he does not believe the move will prompt other hotels in Malaysia to follow suit.
“It doesn’t do anything to their business. We do it because we grow durians on the premises. We have the annual durian festival … and we’ll include the Durian Research Center in the near future,” he said.

FASTFACT

Musang Kings are considered premium durians due to their intense yet well-balanced, custardy sweet taste. They are the premier durians for export to China and other overseas markets.

Tan expressed his hope that the center, which is under construction, will become a premier research hub for better durian breeds.
“I hope to create a Super Musang King,” he said. Musang Kings are considered premium durians due to their intense yet well-balanced, custardy sweet taste. They are the premier durians for export to China and other overseas markets.
Tan sees the resort’s agritourism ecosystem as a long-term goal toward creating a platform for durian research and cultivation.
“These durian-friendly zones are created to be a platform for agriculture. Durians have a place in many people’s hearts. They’re a national treasure,” he added.