‘Political solution only way to end Yemen conflict’: Saudi crown prince and PM May agree

The Crown Prince held meetings with UK PM Theresa May at Downing Street during his three-day tour of the UK. (REUTERS)
Updated 08 March 2018
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‘Political solution only way to end Yemen conflict’: Saudi crown prince and PM May agree

LONDON: Saudi Arabia and Britain agreed that a political solution is only way to end the conflict and humanitarian suffering in Yemen, during a meeting at 10 Downing Street on Wednesday. 
PM May agreed with Saudi Crown PRince Mohammed Bin Salman on the importance of full and unfettered humanitarian and commercial access, including ports access. 
Later on Wednesday, the Saudi Arabian and British foreign ministers held a joint press conference to lay out agreements between the two countries.
The UK and Saudi Arabian FMs agreed to monitor the navigation routes in preparation of the reopening of the ports in Yemen.
UK's Boris Johnson said that the UK has called for an international meeting to discuss with Saudi Arabia a political solution in Yemen. He said that the world understood Saudi Arabia's right to protect its borders.
Saudi Arabia's Adel Al-Jubeir said that Saudi Arabia supported the transitional process and political dialogue in Yemen and the war in the country was imposed on Saudi Arabia, but that the Kingdom will continue to provide humanitarian assistance to Yemen after the war's conclusion.
He also added that Riyadh and London agreed on the necessity to deter Iran and stop its support terrorism, while Johnson said Iran was playing a disruptive and dangerous role in Yemen and destabilizing the region.
Meanwhile, Al-Jubeir said that there were great opportunities for cooperation with the UK to achieve the Crown Prince's Vision 2030 in Saudi Arabia.


Saudi Arabia’s nuclear program ‘fundamental to Kingdom’s energy sector’

Updated 18 September 2018
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Saudi Arabia’s nuclear program ‘fundamental to Kingdom’s energy sector’

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia’s atomic energy program is fundamental for developing a sustainable energy sector, a senior minister told the International Atomic Energy Agency on Monday.
The Kingdom plans to start building its first two nuclear power reactors this year and as many as 16 over the next 25 years at a cost of more than $80 billion. The plan is to provide 15 percent of Saudi Arabia’s power from nuclear by 2032.
Speaking at the IAEA’s annual conference in Vienna, Energy Minister Khalid Al-Falih said the atomic reactor projects were were part of the Kingdom’s Vision 2030 to diversify its energy sources to nuclear and renewables.
The program “abides by all international treaties and conventions and best practices, adhering to the highest standards of safety, security and transparency,” Al Falih said.
The minister said Saudi Arabia was committed to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, which calls for nuclear disarmament and stresses the commitment of nuclear power states to share their peaceful technologies with abiding member states.
He also said the Kingdom had called for cooperation with the international community to make the Middle East a nuclear weapons free area.
The US has started to reintroduce heavy sanctions against Iran over its nuclear program, after Donald Trump pulled out of a deal with the country earlier this year to curb its atomic ambitions.
Al-Falih called on the international community to take a more stringent stance against all threats to regional and international security, particularly Iran, given its “alarming efforts to build its nuclear capabilities, in tandem with its increasing acts of sabotage and aggression against other states in the region.”