Knifeman killed at Iran ambassador’s Vienna home: police

An officer blocks a street when police is on the hunt for an attacker after several people have been injured in a knife attack on the streets of Vienna, Austria, in this March 7, 2018 photo. (AP)
Updated 12 March 2018
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Knifeman killed at Iran ambassador’s Vienna home: police

VIENNA, Austria: A 26-year-old Austrian was shot dead outside the Iranian ambassador’s residence in Vienna on Sunday night after he attacked a guard with a knife, police said.
The assailant “died on the spot” after the soldier opened fire, police spokesman Harald Soeros told AFP, adding that the attack took place just before midnight local time.
The motive for the attack is not yet known, police said.
The soldier, who was standing guard outside the building, suffered a wound to his upper arm in the attack.
“He initially used pepper spray” against the assailant, Soeros said, before opening fire. He was believed to have fired his weapon at least four times.
According to early indications he “acted within the rules,” said a spokesman from the ministry of defense quoted by the APA agency.
The official added that the soldier, who is from the Tyrol region of Austria, has been treated in hospital.
Police have ordered reinforcements around all diplomatic missions in the city.
The incident comes just days after two knife attacks in Vienna, including one that left a couple and their 17-year-old daughter with severe injuries.
A 23-year-old Afghan national confessed to those assaults but denied any political motive.
 


Sweden’s Center Party to reject Lofven as PM

Sweden's Prime Minister Stefan Lofven arrives at a European Union leaders summit in Brussels, Belgium October 17, 2018. (REUTERS)
Updated 57 min 31 sec ago
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Sweden’s Center Party to reject Lofven as PM

  • The September election gave neither the center-left nor the center-right a majority, leaving the balance of power with the Sweden Democrats

STOCKHOLM: Attempts to form a new Swedish government were back at square one on Monday after the Center Party said it would vote against Social Democrat leader Stefan Lofven’s return as prime minister because he had rejected their policy demands.
Sweden has been without a government since a Sept. 9 election delivered a hung parliament which subsequently voted Lofven out as prime minister after four years in office and then also rejected the candidacy of the leader of the four-party center-right Alliance.
The Center and Liberal parties, nominally party of the Alliance, said last month they were willing to support Lofven if he accepted a number of major policy compromises, including lower taxes and more liberal labor laws.
But Center leader Annie Loof said Lofven had been unwilling to back down on several of their key demands.
“We would have need to see considerably more liberal political reforms in order for the Center party to be able to come to an agreement and allow Stefan Lofven four more years,” Loof told reporters.
The September election gave neither the center-left nor the center-right a majority, leaving the balance of power with the Sweden Democrats, a hard-right anti-immigration party that mainstream groups refuse to deal with.
With no signs of compromise, it is unclear what will happen now. If parliament rejects four prime ministerial candidates, then there will automatically be a fresh election.