Women’s Economic Forum opens in Riyadh

The forum brings together up to 1,000 business leaders, entrepreneurs, diversity champions and policy-makers from across the Kingdom to advance women in leadership. (AN photo by Khaleed Alkhames)
Updated 20 March 2018
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Women’s Economic Forum opens in Riyadh

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia is opening a new page in its history, Sophie Le Ray, founder of the WIL Series, said as she opened the Women’s Economic Forum in Riyadh on Monday.
Le Ray said that the GCC countries were creating jobs and making it easier and more socially acceptable for women to join the workforce. Saudi Arabia was opening a new page in its history, making remarkable social changes and highlighting its determination to move forward to a more prosperous future, she said.
“The empowerment of women is one of the keys to the modernization objectives set out in the ambitious Vision 2030 and National Transformation Program,” she said.
“Economic performance, innovation, creativity and the economic landscape of the Arab world will be transformed by the skills, talents and labors of women.”
Ten years ago, this inaugural forum was held in Dubai, only attended by women, she said. “Ten years later, we have both genders from all over the world to discuss and champion diversity. It’s a community which is captivating everyone.”
“Empowering women and moving toward a more inclusive society is just smart economics. We are past the point of just conversation, today is about action,” she said.
With 900 people registered to the attend the forum, the attendees were looking forward to hearing from the panel of speakers. A student studying at Dar Al-Hekma University flew in from Jeddah to attend. “I’m very excited to attend and learn,” she said.
She said that she looked forward to finishing her B.A, then masters, and the hopefully would open her own company.
Hadley Gamble, a reporter for CNBC, said: “Men must be our allies; we can work together and change this dynamic and narrative.”
She added: “We can’t understate the importance of what Mohammed bin Salman did.”
Yasser Mufti, vice president, strategy and market analysis at Saudi Aramco, said: “Aramco has made much progress in gender diversity. I went back to marketing, in Aramco Trading, and became a CEO. There was a significant change, one third of the floor were women; we had 170 female employees in Dhahran in various sectors.”
“Seize the opportunity you are given” is the crucial piece of advice that he has given to women and also male counterparts. “With determination you will succeed, and inshallah make Vision 2030 a reality.”
“This can’t be about quotas, it’s about empowering women and hiring women and putting them in management positions. Hire the right people for your team. We have a lot of educated women and it’s going to be tough to choose. We are going to need our male allies to come to the floor and help us with that.”


KSRelief to provide 5,000 Yemenis with school supplies

Saudi Arabia is ranked the first donor in the world when it comes to humanitarian financial and logistical support in Yemen. AFP
Updated 8 min 5 sec ago
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KSRelief to provide 5,000 Yemenis with school supplies

  • There are two million Yemeni children out of school because of the Houthis’ aggression against civilians
  • The total cost of all the projects provided by KSRelief since its establishment is $70 million

JEDDAH: King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief) has launched a project to provide Yemeni students and schools with supplies to ensure that education continues across the country despite the brutal acts of militants. The trucks started to carrying the aid from Riyadh to Yemen on Monday.

“It is a project to provide Yemen’s schools with the essential needs to ensure a better and smoother educational environment, such as chairs, desks, and boards, in addition to students’ supplies. It will support nearly 5,000 students across Yemen,” said Dr. Samer Aljetaily, spokesman for KSRelief.
“The trucks will arrive first in Ma’arib, then it will be distributed to the most needed areas across the country’s schools and students.”
“My Education” is one of the big projects given to support Yemen’s people in health, shelter, infrastructure, environment and education to help the country stand on its feet regardless of any devastation caused by the militants.
“The total cost of all the projects provided by KSRelief since its establishment is $70 million. In terms of education, the center has given financial aid to schools, paid teachers’ salaries, and provided students’ essential school needs and meals. We will continue supporting our brothers and sisters in Yemen in all sectors.”
This project has been supported by the Saudi Ministry of Education and the Saudi-led Islamic Military Coalition. “The coalition always supports our all initiatives in the interest of Yemeni citizens. The coalition will protect the aid till it arrives in Ma’arib, then it will support logistically to facilitate the distribution of the supplies. Education is a priority for the Saudi government and for KSRelief.
“We have always supported education in Yemen and always will, whether it is for schools, educational institutions, students, teachers, or even educational curricular and psychological support departments to help students become better amid all the horrific acts caused by the Houthis. KSRelief is very keen on building a strong future with a well-educated generation of Yemenis.”
Asked whether there is a lack of international support for Yemen, he told Arab News: “Saudi Arabia, along with the UAE, has attracted global attention to Yemen’s humanitarian status in different ways, including direct funding for the infrastructure of the country and huge support for health, education and the environment. Saudi Arabia is ranked the first donor in the world when it comes to humanitarian, financial and logistical support in Yemen. This has encouraged other countries’ support as well.
“The UAE has greatly supported the Yemen humanitarian file with $1 billion. The international community has reacted to this.
“However, there must be more international collaboration to reduce the militants’ attacks on the aid and supplies and facilitate the entry of aid and ensure a higher level of safety. There is also need for better cooperation to protect students and children in the militants’ controlled areas,” he emphasized.
“The Saudi Ministry of Education has supported this initiative by providing school supplies and students’ essential supplies.”
There are two million Yemeni children out of school because of the Houthis’ aggression against civilians.