Careem insists business as usual in Egypt despite legal row

Careem said it had full confidence in Egypt’s judicial system following a legal move to halt the operations of the company alongside rival Uber. (Reuters)
Updated 21 March 2018
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Careem insists business as usual in Egypt despite legal row

LONDON: Careem said it had full confidence in Egypt’s judicial system following a legal move to halt the operations of the company alongside rival Uber.
The pair are the focus of protests by Egyptian taxi drivers who say that their drivers are not required to pay fees to operate transportation services.
An Egyptian court this week accepted a petition that demanded the government stop licensing Uber and Careem activities in Egypt, including their online applications, state-owned newspaper Al-Ahram reported.
The lawyer representing taxi drivers, Khaled Al-Gamal, told AFP that the ruling would have to be implemented by the government even if Uber and UAE-based Careem appeal.
“They have to stop operations and block their mobile applications on the Internet,” he told AFP.
But both companies said their operations have not been officially suspended.
“We have full confidence in the Egyptian judicial system and should any verdict be reached against the ride-hailing industry, we will follow the requisite judicial procedures available under Egyptian Law,” said Careem in a statement to Arab News. “For now, we will continue as business as usual.”


Ride-sharing app Careem says it was hacked

Updated 30 sec ago
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Ride-sharing app Careem says it was hacked

  • The Dubai-based competitor to Uber said in a blog post on Monday that it became aware of the hack on Jan. 14
  • While credit card information remains safe, Careem says that the hackers got access to customers' name, email addresses, phone numbers and trip data

DUBAI: The Mideast ride-sharing app Careem says it has been hacked.
The Dubai-based competitor to Uber said in a blog post on Monday that it became aware of the hack on Jan. 14 and that it affected "computer systems which hold customer and captain account data." Careem refers to its drivers as captains.
While credit card information remains safe, Careem says that the hackers got access to customers' name, email addresses, phone numbers and trip data.
Careem is one of just a few Gulf startups to be valued at $1 billion. The six-year-old company localized the idea of Uber by also allowing customers to pay by cash.
Among its biggest investors is an investment firm chaired by billionaire Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal and the largely state-owned Saudi Telecom Co.